Will War on Islam End in 2013?


Today – eleven and one-half years after the controlled demolition of the World Trade Center launched the War on Islam – that war is bogged down in the mother of all quagmires.
The neoconservatives who orchestrated 9/11 hoped that their stealth war on Islam would achieve quick regime change throughout the Middle East, and break the back of Islamic political movements worldwide.
To that end, they invaded Iraq and Afghanistan in order to surround Iran with US military bases. They intended to invade Iran, and destroy its Islamic revolution, by 2005 at the latest.
But the heroic resistance of the Iraqis, Lebanese and Palestinians, and shrewd strategic moves by Iran – together with ideological challenges by the peace movement, the 9/11 truth movement, and the anti-Zionist movement – slowed them down.
·

IF ‘TERRORISM’ MEANS  “THE INTERNATIONAL SLAUGHTER OF CIVILIANS”,  THE US AND ISRAEL COMMIT THOUSANDS OF TIMES MORE TERRORISM THAN ALL THE MUSLIMS OF THE WORLD PUT TOGETHER.”

·

by Kevin Barrett

 

·

I used to celebrate the New Year in the usual way: By staying up late and drinking too much.

Then I came to Islam, weaned myself from the bottle, and changed my habits…many of them, anyway.

But I still can’t get over the habit of wishing for better things in the coming year.

Possibly the best thing that could happen in 2013 would be a clean, decisive end to the so-called “war on terror,” which is actually a low-intensity war of deception targeting Muslims and the religion of Islam.

***

Public opinion polls show that the vast majority of the world’s Muslims know that the “War on Terror” is a barely-disguised War on Islam. And it isn’t just Muslims who understand this. So do all serious Western strategic thinkers.

One of the few who is willing to say it openly is James Schall, Professor of Government at Georgetown University and Hoover Institute strategist: “I always thought it was a mistake not to say what Iraq really was, that is, a war against an expanding Islam.”

But today – eleven and one-half years after the controlled demolition of the World Trade Center launched the War on Islam – that war is bogged down in the mother of all quagmires.

The neoconservatives who orchestrated 9/11 hoped that their stealth war on Islam would achieve quick regime change throughout the Middle East, and break the back of Islamic political movements worldwide. To that end, they invaded Iraq and Afghanistan in order to surround Iran with US military bases. They intended to invade Iran, and destroy its Islamic revolution, by 2005 at the latest.

But the heroic resistance of the Iraqis, Lebanese and Palestinians, and shrewd strategic moves by Iran – together with ideological challenges by the peace movement, the 9/11 truth movement, and the anti-Zionist movement – slowed them down.

By August of 2007, neocon front man Dick Cheney realized that his last opportunity to invade Iran was slipping from his grasp. So Cheney’s rogue network attempted to steal nuclear weapons from the US arsenal at Minot Air Force Base, with the intention of using those weapons, whether in the US itself or the Middle East, in order to trigger all-out war on Iran.

Stupid move. The nuke-thieves got caught. Dozens were suicided or met “accidental” deaths.

The command structure of the US military does not look kindly on people who try to steal nuclear weapons – even if the thief-in-chief is the Vice President of the United States.

Since then, the US military has closed ranks against the neocons. The invasion of Iran – the chief objective of the 9/11 conspirators – has been postponed indefinitely, to the infinite chagrin of Netanyahu and his “American” allies. And the larger War on Islam has lost its focus.

But how can it end? When nations are at war, the duly-constituted authorities of both nations can end the war by signing a peace treaty. But since the aggressors (with a few exceptions like Schall) refuse to admit that they are waging war on Islam, and since Islam has no “duly constituted authority” capable of negotiating anything, it is hard to imagine how a peace treaty could end hostilities.

To understand how the War on Islam could end, we must first understand what is really at stake. What is this war really about?

It is certainly not about terrorism. Even if we provisionally accept the official story of 9/11 (which is now doubted by the majority of the world), an American is more than ten times more likely to be struck by lightning, or drown in a bathtub, than to be killed by any kind of terrorist. And according to the FBI, radical Muslims only commit 6% of terrorist attacks – less than radical Jews, and vastly less than radical leftists and hispanics.

And if “terrorism” means “the intentional slaughter of civilians,” the US and Israel commit thousands of times more terrorism than all the Muslims of the world put together. According to studies by Gideon Polya, M.D., the US and its ally, Great Britain, have murdered roughly eight million Iraqis alone since 1950. The total number of victims of US and Israeli state terrorism since World War II, what scholar William Blum calls “the American Holocaust,” is in the tens of millions.

So if it isn’t really about “terrorism” then what’s the actual bone of contention? The short answer: Demographics and religiosity.

Islam is the fastest-growing religion in the world, in part through conversions, but mostly through demographics. Even though Muslim birthrates are falling in most parts of the world, they aren’t falling quite as fast as Western birthrates, which are now below replacement levels and heralding an impending demographic collapse. (Russia and Italy, for example, are projected to lose half their population within a few generations).

Why are Muslim birthrates relatively high? Because Islam is a religion of what we might call “traditional family values.”

Sexuality under Islam is limited to community-sanctioned procreative relationships (otherwise known as marriage), and the various vices that have largely destroyed the family in the West – alcohol, drugs, promiscuity, open homosexuality, widespread divorce, egotism, materialism, consumerism and so on – are only making limited progress in their war on the Islamic family.

So since Islamic families are relatively happier and more stable, they have more children which means more Muslims.

And that scares some Western policy-makers, especially those who have a strong personal attachment to the state of Israel. The demographic tilt towards Islam will inevitably result in a readjustment of the global balance of power – raising questions about continued Western control of Middle Eastern and Central Asian energy resources, and even thornier questions about the future of Occupied Palestine.

The perceived problem isn’t just the demographics, it’s the potential for Islamic unity turning into a global political force which, in tandem with the rise of China and India, could rob the West of its current status as global hegemon.

And it is the shared religiosity of Muslims, the social bonds fostered by religion that draw Muslims together and offer them a chance to readjust the global balance of power in their favor.

Proponents of the War on Islam cannot admit this openly. They cannot say “our real objective is to damage the religion of Islam, break up the Islamic family, and try to reduce the global Muslim population.” They cannot admit that their real objective is genocide.

So they are waging a war of deception. By smearing Muslims as subhuman “terrorists” they can covertly commit genocide while pretending to be the good guys.

The neocons have squandered their opportunity for a sudden, decisive blow against Islam. That means that only two alternatives remain: Either the low-intensity War on Islam will continue indefinitely, with its endless drone killings, false-flag terror strikes, genocidal media propaganda, attempts to provoke intra-Muslim strife, assassinations of Iranian scientists, and so on; or it will end quickly and cleanly with a Western confession that the whole “War on Terror” has been a big lie.

The second alternative would be much cheaper, in terms of blood and treasure.

Here is how it could happen: Senior US military commanders, tired of spilling American blood for Israel, organize a counter-coup against those complicit in the 9/11 operation.

They declare a state of emergency and arrest several dozen current and retired military and intelligence officers, a host of politicians including most of the leading neoconservatives, the owners and decision-makers of the major mainstream media outlets, several of the planet’s wealthiest individuals, and key unregistered agents of Israel who operate behind the facade of America’s leading Jewish organizations. Seizing control of the newspapers and airwaves, they reveal the truth about 9/11 to a shocked, outraged world. Swift military-style trials elicit confessions and convictions.
Islam is declared innocent. Zionism is guilty. Palestine is liberated. And the war is finally over.

Will it happen in 2013?

If YOU work hard enough spreading the truth about 9/11 and the phony “War on Terror,” anything is possible.

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Into Iran from Pakistan [2 of 2]


Yazd is the capital of Yazd province in Iran, and a centre of Zoroastrian culture. The city is located 270 km south east of Isfahan. Because of generations of adaptations to its desert surroundings, Yazd is architecturally a unique city. Its known for its high quality handicrafts, especially silk weaving and sweet shops. Its the driest major city in Iran, with an average annual rainfall of only 60 millimetres (2.4 in), and also the hottest one north of the Persian Gulf coast, with summer temperatures very frequently above 40 °C in blazing sunshine with no humidity.
·

YAZD, THE DESERT CITY, ISFAHAN, NISF-E-JAHAN, QOM AND TEHRAN

·

by Hafeez R. M.

·

YAZD

I left Kerman on the night-bus. It had reclining seats. The desert was continuing and there would be nothing much to see. By early hours, the bus reached Yazd, 337 miles away in approximately 7 hours.

Zoroastrian Tower of Silence. Yazd being centre of Zoroastrian culture in Iran, too has its tower of silence, which is a circular building on a desert hill. Zoroastrians do not believe in polluting the elements, so these towers were devised in ancient times as a place for  dead bodies, which would be picked clean by the vultures.

Yazd turned out to be a medium sized town. It had many historical buildings like Alexander prison, large wind-bells and wall paintings. There was a high tower. Narrow and dark stairs led to the top. I went up resting in between to catch my breath.

Once there, I was spellbound by the magnificent view of the town and its suburbs. The new houses were built on old designs discarding European styles. Villages followed a rectangular pattern with high mud walls and flat roofs. I saw a lot of greenery all around. Among sand dunes, there were trees and bushes like tamarisk, poplar, date palm, acacia and willow.

I met many foreign tourists mostly from France. As per their advice, I decided to go by train to Esfahan hardly at a distance of 285 km.

TRAIN JOURNEY

The train passed through Desh-e Kavir, which mingles with Dasht-e Lut described earlier. US forces had landed in Kavir Desert in 1980 in an abortive mission to rescue hostages held at American Embassy in Tehran. Kavir was a rainless region and barren except for some oases irrigated by qanats (canals).

ISFAHAN

I reached Esfahan in the after noon. It was not as hot as Yazd but rather pleasant. I was out of the desert and into greener pasture. Esfahan was one time capital of Persia and designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage site. The famous rhyme Esfahan nesf-e-jahan (Esfahan is half the world) was coined in the 16th century to express the city grandeur.  

TRAIN JOURNEY

The train passed through Desh-e Kavir, which mingles with Dasht-e Lut described earlier. US forces had landed in Kavir Desert in 1980 in an abortive mission to rescue hostages held at American Embassy in Tehran. Kavir was a rainless region and barren except for some oases irrigated by qanats (canals).

Imam Mosque in Isfahan, Iran or the Masjed-e Imam stands on the south side of Naghsh-i-Jahan Square. Built during the Safavid period, it is an excellent example of Islamic architecture of Iran, and regarded as one of the master pieces of Persian architecture. Alongwith Naghsh-i- Jahan Square, the mosque is a UNESCO Heritage Site. The construction of the mosque began in 1611, and its splendor is mainly due to the beauty of its seven-color mosaic tiles and the calligraphic inscritions.

In the evening I had a walk. Most remarkable feature was a big square, roughly seven times larger than San Marco in Venice. Besides, Emam Mosque looked majestic with cool blue tiles. Within walking distance, I found more mosques, palaces, bridges and gardens. It was a city for getting lost in the bazaar and dozing in beautiful gardens.

At night I went to a traditional restaurant. There were singers, both professional and amateur. Though I did not understand a word of Farsi, I was bewitched when listening to poems in the local dialect.

Carpet weaving craft is widely practiced as a handicrafts industry, mostly in Muslim countries like Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran and Central Asian Republics. So the people in different Iranian provinces too pracce this particularly  in places like Yazd, Isfahan, Tabriz and Kashan etc. In the image above, masterly fingers of a carpet weaver blend the colors into wool fibers to weave a mosaic of beautiful patterns. No surprise then that Persian carpets fetch good prices in the local as wellas foreign markets.

Esfahan was famous for its carpets. There was a bazaar having carpets of various colours: the scarlet, green and yellow Kashan, the red-blood and black Turkoman. A shopkeeper, Agha Mossadegh, recalled the past: At one time, I had three hundred children making carpets with their delicate fingers. Now, child labour is banned. Adult are no match. Carpets are not as fancy as they used to be.

AIR SAFARI

By moving around, I found out that air-fares were very low. The catch was that you had to book far in advance. A footloose and fancy free traveler like me could not afford advance booking. Still when an opportunity came, I jumped on it. An airline agent of Kish Air offered me a ready seat on its 44-seater plane to my next destination, Qom. Flying at medium altitude, I get an exceptionally attractive view of Iran territory. I saw the colors of the desert and the striking profile of mountain ranges.

QOM

Hardly 125 miles away, touching Qom was just a hop-on, hop-off affair. Qom is a holy city of Shi’ite Muslims on the River. There are many religious schools dedicated to teaching of Islam. A large number of Students come to Qom from all corners of Iran.

Hazrat-e- Masumeh,Qom, the holy city lies 156kilometres (97 mi) by road south west of Tehran and is the capital of Qom Province. Qom is considered holy by Shia Muslims, as it is the site of the shrine of Fatima al Masumeh, the sisterof Imam Ali ibn Musa Rida (Persian Imam Reza, 789–816 AD).The city is th largest centre for Shia scholarship in theworld, and is a significant destination of pilgrimage. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lfphotos/1258284797/sizes/z/in/photostream/

It takes at least 20-30 years to master the Quran and Hadith to become an Ayatollah. Qom was the center of movement against Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi that ended up with toppling up his regime in 1979.

My feet were aching and legs quaking. I dived into a restaurant. The waiter greeted me by saying, Chelo kebab?
Anything else?

Chicken rice.
Chelo kebab would be OK.

Kheili khub! the waiter said happily, he meant Very good!

He went away and returned with a number of plates containing raw onion, yogurt, white rice and butter. Finally he brought a plate of kebab, about nine inches of grilled meat, pulled off the skewer but still sticking together. That was delicious indeed.

TEHRAN

From Qom, I boarded a bus reaching Tehran in about three hours covering 125 km. The bus station was quite out of town. An Iranian offered me a lift, in his private car, near to Ayub Bridge where I had a friendly family from Pakistan. Do you live there? I asked. Yes but I do it for money, he said curtly. He quoted a small price. Later, when we drove, I noticed that he was picking up passengers and dropping them off on the way to Ayub Bridge. He safely delivered to me to my friends. They had a small but well furnished flat in a four-storied plaza. In the evening, they took me to the roof-top. I was amazed to see snow-clad mountain, Alborz. It was a little hot on the roof top but quite cool inside flat because of a desert cooler. ( It just draws dry air and passes it through water to make it little cool ).

Azadi or Freedom Square is the largest square in Tehran and the second largest in Iran, being smaller than Naqsh-e- Jahan Square in Isfahan. The 50 m Azadi Tower is in the centre of the square. It was called Shahyad Square; literally meaning “Remebrance of the Shahs (Kings) before the Iranian Revolution, and was the site of many of the Revolution’s demonstrations leading up to overthrow of Shah Reza Pehlvi’s brutal regime [12 December 1979]. http://www.irangashttour.com/en/cities.htm

Tehran, the capital, is a modern city but has retained its past. It has several good museum and historical buildings. Tehran is a large city, cool and shady. Roads are overarched by trees like chenars and walnut. The safety and security is superb. I moved freely without any hassle. Many a times, I got lost but not for long. I just asked for a bus to Emam Khomeini Square. Once there, I could restart my sight-seeing. Buses were cheap. Tickets could be purchased in bulk. All buses had the same fare. (Just peel off a ticket and pass it on to the conductor, no question asked).

One day, I went upto Shaheed Motahari Mosque with its eight towering minarets. It was a good place to view the city. Albroz mountains were in North and a tall Telephone Office in South, both being landmarks of Tehran.

Of all the places, I enjoyed an easy stroll in Tehran Bazaar. An endless maze of alleys, a criss cross of narrow passages. Light filtered down from the openings at the top. Everything from fine carpets to silver wares to aromatic spices could be found here. There was a separate section for each trade. Skilled workers were busy in weaving capets or making copper work, a la viva live display of craftsmanship. There were rows and rows of art and antique-dealers. They were offering, at throw-away prices, pictures of Shah Abbas ( the great king), of Leila and Majnun (the great lovers) and of Rustom (the great hero).

THE MOUNTAIN TRAIN

Having spent more days in Tehran, I wanted to rush to Turkey. But the border was about 910 km away and nearest town was still ahead. This dampened my enthusiasm. I decided to have a break at Tabriz, about 650 km away. The route was mountainous and winding. Elborz Mountains rose steeply, west of Tehran along Iraqi and Turkish borders. Unless I sit on front seat, I always had a headache. So I decided to take a train though it had a longer route at 736 km or 86 km more than the road. It was a lovely journey and offered panoramic view of the terrain.

TABRIZ

When the train neared Tabriz, the landscape turned awesome with shady roads, parks and lakes. One could see a large red cliff overlooking the valley of the Tailkel river which ran through Tabriz. There was an old village, Kandovan, with the houses dug into the rocks at high altitude. The rocks looked like pyramids.

Interior of Tabriz Bazaar http://blog.travelpod.com/travel-photo/jimsim/1/1248693404/interior-of-tabriz-bazaar.jpg/tpod.html

Since I had a small pack, I swiftly went out of the station. As many as dozen taxi drivers raided me. I submitted to one of them and the rest started a brawl over loss of business. The taxi took me to a private guesthouse which turned to be a best ever backpacker in Iran.

Tabriz is reputed as a center of Oriental culture. It produces high quality ceramics and carpets containing birds, floral and hunting scenes. Population of Tabriz is rather mixed: Armenians, Turkomans and Kurds. They work on the roads, side by side wearing long leather boots, woollen headgear, and multi-colored fabrics. The Blue Mosque of Tabriz is a sight. The central dome of the mosque is 16 meters in diameter and decorated with finest mosaic with golden inscriptions. Pious Muslims in their turbans, robes and Turkish Slippers moved in large number on the call of each prayer.

BAZARGAON

Another 260 kms travel would take me out of Iran and into Turkey. The roads passed through the mountains were quite hazardous. At long last, I entered Turkey and found myself in more friendly atmosphere. Turkey and Pakistan have long historical ties and are close allies in soico-economic and political fields.
Continue to Part 3

Contd…

Next: Into Iran from Pakistan [1 of 2]

Page  1   

More Posts from Hafeez R. M. on Wonders of Pakistan

1. Footloose in East Africa – [in three parts] 2. Escape for a while   3. The Shrine of Hazrat Ayub Ansari in Istanbul 4. Sacred Crocodiles 5. Shalimar Gardens, Lahore 6. Gorakh Hills, A pleasant surprise 7. The tomb of Hazrat Abdullah Shah Ghazi 8. Thar coal – hope or despair [in three parts]
Note: This is an old yet interesting travellogue [as you might have also noticed], hence the prices and costs of staying at different places mentioned by the writer may be much higher than the ones prevailing at the time he undertook this journey.
Hafeezur Rahman Malik is an ex-Bank Executive. As says Hafeez, he now whiles away his time in teaching and traveling. Each year in summer and winter holidays, he goes on a footloose and fancy-free safari to a new country or to a new area of a large country like USA. His travel tales are published by various websites specially www.hubpages.com & www.cstn.org . He lives in Karachi, Pakistan, with wife and a cat.Email: hafeezr@bigfoot.com
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Published in: on 26/06/2012 at 4:33 pm  Comments (2)  
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Into Iran from Pakistan [1 of 2]


Zahedan is the capital of Sistan and Balochistan province in Iran. It lies at an altitude of 1,352 m from sea level. A relatively  small desert town Zahedan has wide avenues with little vehicle traffic, small residential houses and solitary municipal buildings built of a light sandstone, universities, football clubs, a prominent central mosque and the ordinary, cargo-cult life of Iranians. Like most Iranian cities, Zahedan has a Friday mosque, where many members of the community gather to worship on Friday. Its called Makki Mosque and is a landmark of the city. It is the greatest mosque of Sunni Muslims in Iran. Image by Baloch Khan
·

ZAHEDAN, DASHT-E-LUT DESERT AND TO KERMAN

·

by Hafeez R. M.

·

There was no change in topography when the train crossed into Iran. The sun had set in. A pitch dark had pervaded outside. The smugglers had left leaving me all-alone. I became terrified. Anyone could barge in through inter-connected compartments. I am chicken at heart. Fear of mugging haunts me. I had TCs of $1,000, a credit card and five notes of $50 each. All these were individually wrapped and stashed at various places. One $50 note was capsuled and dropped in a vitamin pill bottle. Another was tucked away in the trouser-belt. I kept on roaming my hands back and forth checking my inventory. The body language would deter any predator.

ZAHIDAN

It was past mid-night when the train pulled into Zahidan, 92 km from the border. I was amazed with flood lights and water fountains. Soon I spotted a seraie (inn). I was given a comfortable room for only one-dollar. The old man was with me. I deemed it my responsibility to get him to his folks in Tehran. Next morning we went to the Bus Station. First, I got his Tehran address translated into Persian. Second, I had him boarded a bus for Tehran, 1700 km away in 35 hours. Third, I range up his folks and alerted them of his arrival. Having suitably disposed him off, I felt relieved and returned to the city centre. I stayed there for two more days and spent seven dollars in all. The purchasing power parity of dollar was surprising. I figured out that prices were atleast ten times lower than those in USA.

Zahidan appeared a relaxed city with wide tree-lined avenues. It was a good place to have a taste of Iran. I started from breakfast. Hot tea, cheese and local bread were abundantly available. In addition, one can have asal (honey), mast (yogurt), khorma (dates) and khameh (soft cream) for breakfast. Halva shekari is used as a sweetener. It is a kind of paste made of sugar, butter and sesame seeds. Iranians eat hot and fresh. I opted for honey and yogurt. I sprinkled it with dry fruits to make it delicious, hearty and wholesome.

After filling my belly, I roamed in the market. Iran religiosity was its most striking feature. Males were modestly dressed, many wearing western clothing without tie. Some wore aba (cloak) of black colour. Females had covered their hairs with scarves and bodies with long coats. Only face, toes and hands were visible. Women Only was written at many places making it Out of Bound for all males. Despite hustle and bustle of the bazaar, there was calmness. Per chance, I went into a water pipe caf? and had a few puffs of cooled down smoke.

If you haven’t seen Shiraz, you seen nothing, muttered the innkeeper, Agha Hussaini. Shiraz is full of artists, scholars, nightingales, poetry and roses. Go and see tomb of Hafez (a celebrated poet) and delightful Eram garden, he continued. His chatters moved me but Shiraz was far away in the South, not on the road to Tehran.

DESERT JOURNEY

I took an early bus for my next destination, Kerman, some 600 km from Zahidan. The bus passed through a vast desert, Dasht-e-Lut. It seemed impossible to cross it except through the single road over which the bus was running at full throttle. Dasht-e Lut was a sand and stone desert. It looked inhospitable and virtually uninhabited.

 Aab, Aab, I heard someone saying over my head. When I looked up I found the conductor with a water tumbler. He said something clinching his throat and tilting his head to one side. He meant that if I did not sip water, my throat would become bone-dry from hot winds, choking me to death. I grabbed the container and took two big gulps. The conductor had to distribute water every 10 minutes.

KERMAN

Thirty five kilometers south of the city of Kerman, in the small town of Mahan, stands the beautiful pilgrimage shrine of the Sufi saint Shah Nur-ed-Din Nematollah Vali who was an Islamic scholar and a Sufi poet from the 14th and 15th centuries.

After an 11 hours journey, I reached Kerman. It was an ancient city with several stunning mosques and a ruined citadel. The town was clean, no garbage in the streets. I took a room in a nearby guesthouse. Soon, it was dinner time. I was feeling awfully hungry and looked for a good restaurant. Iranian cuisine was heavily based on rice, bread, fresh vegetables, herbs and fruit. Meat was usually lamb or mutton, minced or cut into small chunks. It was used to add flavour and rarely dominant except in kebabs.

Next day, I went to a museum. It was previously a public bath, now a most interesting sight. The main doorway was covered with murals of animals. Also worth seeing was the Art Museum containing a large number of tile-work pictures. In another gallery, there was a display of photographs depicting scenes from the Iran-Iraq war and its effect on the civilian population.

Contd…

Next: Into Iran from Pakistan [2 of 2]

Page     2

More Posts from Hafeez R. M. on Wonders of Pakistan

1. Footloose in East Africa – [in three parts] 2. Escape for a while   3. The Shrine of Hazrat Ayub Ansari in Istanbul 4. Sacred Crocodiles 5. Shalimar Gardens, Lahore 6. Gorakh Hills, A pleasant surprise 7. The tomb of Hazrat Abdullah Shah Ghazi 8. Thar coal – hope or despair [in three parts]
Note: This is an old yet interesting travellogue [as you might have also noticed], hence the prices and costs of staying at different places mentioned by the writer may be much higher than the ones prevailing at the time he undertook this journey.
Hafeezur Rahman Malik is an ex-Bank Executive. As says Hafeez, he now whiles away his time in teaching and traveling. Each year in summer and winter holidays, he goes on a footloose and fancy-free safari to a new country or to a new area of a large country like USA. His travel tales are published by various websites specially www.hubpages.com & www.cstn.org . He lives in Karachi, Pakistan, with wife and a cat.Email: hafeezr@bigfoot.com
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Published in: on 26/06/2012 at 4:31 pm  Comments (3)  
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Iran, A stunningly Beautiful Country


A RICHLY TEXTURED WORLD, RARELY SEEN IN THE WEST

Kaboud Valley Watertfall

COUNTRY OF A WONDERFUL PEOPLE, SMART, CREATIVE FRIENDLY AND PEACEFUL FOLK

Soort Spring, Mazandaran
Qazvin

Neka Forest

Khuzestan
Keyan, Qeshm

Azerbaijan Sharghi

Abmakh Waterfall
Abbasabad

Aborsh Lake, Fars

Alladaghdhar

Bandare Gooran, Hormozgan

Gilan

Gilan, another view

Gohar Lake 

Kamarposht, Mazandaran

Kandaragh Chai River

Kermanshah

Khuzestan

Kish

 Kohgelule, Boyerahmad

Kordestan

Lut Desert 

Mazandaran Forest
 Mazandaran Forest, another View

 Miansheh Lake
Neka Forest, another view
 Neka Forest, yet another view
Orumieh

 

 Qazvin

 Qazvin, another view

 

Qeshm

 SaddeLar Lake

  Shalmesh, Kordestan

 

 Shilavar River, Gilan

Sistan, Balouchistan

Tehran Mountains

Tehran Mountains, another view

Zanjan

Zanjan, another view

_

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YOUR COMMENT IS IMPORTANT

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Wonders of Pakistan supports freedom of expression and this commitment extends to our readers as well. Constraints however, apply in case of a violation of WoP Comments Policy. We also moderate hate speech, libel and gratuitous insults. 
We at Wonders of Pakistan use copyrighted material the use of which may not have always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We make such material available to our readers under the provisions of “fair use” only. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than “fair use” you must request permission from the copyright owner.
Published in: on 19/04/2012 at 10:04 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Ahmadinejad stands by 9/11 probe call


Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad addresses the 65th General Assembly at the United Nations headquarters in New York, September 23, 2010.


FULL TEXT OF IRANIAN PRESIDENT AHMEDINEJAD’S SPEECH AT THE UN

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http://www.worthynews.com/9464-full-text-of-president-ahmadinejads-speech-at-un

United Nations, New York, Sept 24 (Worthy News) — The following is the full text of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s speech delivered to the 65th annual meeting of United Nations General assembly in New York on Thursday.

WE OFFER OUR HEARTFELT SYMPATHY TO FAMILIES  WHO LOST THEIR LOVED ONES IN THE FLOODS THAT CAUSED MASSIVE DEVASTATION IN PAKISTAN

Mr. President, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

I am grateful to the Almighty God who granted me the opportunity to appear before this world assembly once again. I wish to begin by commemorating those who lost their lives in the horrible flood in Pakistan and express my heartfelt sympathy with the families who lost their loved ones as well as with the people and the government of Pakistan. I urge everyone to assist their fellow men and women as a humane duty.

Let me thank H.E. Mr. Ali Abdussalam Treki, the President of the sixty-fourth session of the United Nations General Assembly, for all his efforts during his tenure. I also would like to congratulate H.E. Mr. Joseph Deiss, the President of the sixty-fifth session of the United Nations General Assembly and wish him all success.

In the past years, I spoke to you about some of the hopes and concerns, including family crises, security, human dignity, world economy, climate change as well as the aspiration for justice and lasting peace.

After about one hundred years of domination, the system of Capitalism and the existing world order has proved to be unable to provide appropriate solution to the problems of societies, thus coming to an end. I shall try to examine the two main causes of this failure and picture some features of the ideal future order.

A) Attitudes and Beliefs

As you are well aware, the divine prophets had the mission to call everyone to monotheism, love and justice and show mankind the path to prosperity. They invite men to contemplation and knowledge in order to better appreciate the truth and to avoid atheism and egoism. The very nature of the message of all prophets is one and the same. Every messenger endorsed the messenger before him and gave glad tidings about the prophet to come, and presented a more complete version of the religion in accordance with the capacity of the man at the time. This continued up to the last messenger of God who presented the perfect and all inclusive religion.

In opposition to that, the egotist and the greedy stood up against this clear call, revolting against the message.

Nimrod countered Hazrat Abraham, Pharaoh countered Hazrat Moses and the greedy countered Hazrat Jesus Christ and Hazrat Mohammad (Peace be upon them all). In the recent centuries, the human ethics and values have been rejected as a cause for backwardness. They were even portrayed as opposing wisdom and science because of the earlier infliction on man by the proclaimers of religion in the dark ages of the West.

Man’s disconnection from Heaven detached him from his true self.

Man with his potentials for understanding the secrets of the universe, his instinct for seeking truth, his aspirations for justice and perfection, his quest for beauty and purity and his capacity to represent God on earth was reduced to a creature limited to the materialistic world with a mission to maximize individualistic pleasures. Human instinct, then, replaced true human nature.

Human beings and nations were considered rivals and the happiness of an individual or a nation was defined in collision with, and elimination or suppression of others. Constructive evolutionary cooperation was replaced with a destructive struggle for survival.

The lust for capital and domination replaced monotheism which is the gate to love and unity.

This widespread clash of the egoist with the divine values gave way to slavery and colonialism. A large portion of the world came under the domination of a few western States. Tens of millions of people were taken to slavery and tens of millions of families were shattered as a result. All the resources, the rights and the cultures of the colonized nations were plundered. Lands were occupied and the indigenous people were humiliated and mass- murdered.

Yet, nations rose up, colonialism was alienated and the independence of the nations was recognized. Thus, the hope for respect, prosperity and security was revived amongst nations. In the beginning of the past century nice talks about freedom, human rights and democracy created hopes for healing the deep wounds of the past. Today, however, not only those dreams are not realized, but memories, even at times worse than before, have been recorded.

As a result of the two World Wars, the occupation of Palestine, the Korean and the Vietnam’s Wars, the Iraqi war against Iran, the occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq as well as many wars in Africa, hundreds of millions of people were killed, wounded or displaced.

Terrorism, illicit drugs, poverty and the social gaps increased. The dictatorial and coup d’état governments in Latin America committed unprecedented crimes with the support of the West.

Instead of disarmament, the proliferation and stockpiling of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons expanded, putting the world under a bigger threat. As a result, the very same old goals of colonialists and the slave masters were, this time round, pursued with a new facade.

B) The Global Management and Ruling Structures

The League of Nations and, then, the United Nations were established with the promise to bring about peace, security and the realization of human rights, which in fact meant a global management.

SLAMS US 9/11 PLOT

One can analyze the current governance of the world by examining three events:

First, the event of the September 2001 which has affected the whole world for almost a decade.

All of a sudden, the news of the attack on the twin towers was broadcast using numerous footages of the incident.

Almost all governments and known figures strongly condemned this incident.

But then a propaganda machine came into full force; it was implied that the whole world was exposed to a huge danger, namely terrorism, and that the only way to save the world would be to deploy forces into Afghanistan.

Eventually Afghanistan, and shortly thereafter Iraq were occupied.

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