US-Saudi Funded Terrorists Sowing Chaos in Pakistan


Fauzia Qurban
Photo: AP Pakistani sister Fauzia Qurban an ethnic Hazara, tries to hold back her tears as she talks about her brother Ali Raza Qurban, at her family home in Quetta, Pakistan.
Brutal sectarian bloodletting has killed hundreds of Shiite Muslims in Pakistan’s Balochistan province and fired a flourishing human smuggling business in the provincial capital of Quetta.
·

Balochistan, Pakistan – long target of Western geopolitical interests, terror wave coincides with Gwadar Port handover to China.

·

QUETTA KILLINGS: ORCHESTRATION FOR A PAKISTAN SPRING?

·

by Tony Cartalucci

·

Quetta, the capital of Pakistan’s southwest Balochistan province, bordering both US-occupied Afghanistan as well as Iran, was the site of a grisly market bombing that has killed over 80 people. According to reports, the terrorist group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi has claimed responsibility for the attack.

Billed as a “Sunni extremist group,” it instead fits the pattern of global terrorism sponsored by the US, Israel, and their Arab partners Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

Why Balochistan? Gwadar in the southwest serves as a Chinese port and the starting point for a logistical corridor through Pakistan and into Chinese territory. The Iranian-Pakistani-Indian pipeline would enter from the west, cross through Balochistan intersecting China’s proposed logistical route to the northern border, and continue on to India. Destabilizing Balochistan would effectively derail the geopolitical aspirations of four nations.

The terrorist Lashkar-e-Jhangvi group was in fact created, according to the BBC, to counter Iran’s Islamic Revolution in the 1980′s, and is still active today. Considering the openly admitted US-Israeli-Saudi plot to use Al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups across the Middle East to counter Iran’s influence, it begs the question whether these same interests are funding terrorism in Pakistan to not only counter Iranian-sympathetic Pakistani communities, but to undermine and destabilize Pakistan itself.

THE US -SAUDI GLOBAL TERROR NETWORK

While the United States is close allies with Saudi Arabia and Qatar, it is well established that the chief financier of extremist militant groups for the past three decades, including Al-Qaeda, are in fact Saudi Arabia and Qatar. While Qatari state-owned propaganda like Al Jazeera apply a veneer of progressive pro-democracy to its narratives, Qatar itself is involved in arming, funding, and even providing direct military support for sectarian extremists from northern Mali, to Libya, to Syria and beyond. (more…)

Russia – Pakistan: the Way is Open for New Projects


Following withdrawal of the majority of NATO troops from Afghanistan in 2014, there will remain approximately 10,000 American servicemen (as of 1 January 2013, there were 66,000 American soldiers and officers in the country).
The American contingent staying on in Afghanistan will, just as before, need supplies of food, fuel and other products and these will be delivered to Afghanistan via tried and tested routes – through Pakistan and Russia. This means that the coordination of actions between Moscow and Islamabad is also important from this angle…
In general, improving relations between Russia and Pakistan could have a positive influence on the situation both in Afghanistan itself and in Central Asia.
·

BREAKTHROUGH IN RUSSIA PAKISTAN  RELATIONS ON THE ANVIL

·

by Sergey Kamenev

·

At the start of February this year, a trilateral meeting between the presidents of Pakistan, Afghanistan and British prime minister dealing with the situation in Afghanistan came to an end in London. The outcome of the meeting was an agreement for a strategic Pakistan-Afghanistan partnership.

Following the withdrawal of NATO troops from Afghanistan in 2014, close cooperation between Kabul and Islamabad will have a decisive influence on the situation in Afghanistan.

For Russia, the importance of relations with Pakistan is already on the increase, if only the involvement Afghanistan in drug trafficking is considered, as the bulk of the drugs ends up in Russia and the rest goes to Europe. 

Following the withdrawal of the majority of NATO troops from Afghanistan in 2014, there will remain approximately 10,000 American servicemen (as of 1 January 2013, there were 66,000 American soldiers and officers in the country). The American contingent staying on in Afghanistan will, just as before, need supplies of food, fuel and other products and these will be delivered to Afghanistan via tried and tested routes – through Pakistan and Russia. This means that the coordination of actions between Moscow and Islamabad is also important from this angle… In general, improving relations between Russia and Pakistan could have a positive influence on the situation both in Afghanistan itself and in Central Asia.

Russia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Tajikistan head of states meeting in Sochi, August 2010

A breakthrough in relations between Russia and Pakistan was made possible by the annual quadrilateral summits between Afghanistan, Pakistan, Russia and Tajikistan, which included bilateral meetings between the presidents of Russia and Pakistan. Initially (in Tajikistan, 2009), an expansion of Russia-Pakistan cooperation was reflected in the establishment of more trusting relationships at a higher level, the signing of several memorandums of mutual understanding and a number of other specific agreements.

Even at that time, substantial discussions were under way at a meeting in Dushanbe between the presidents of Russia and Pakistan regarding the possibility of a concerted combat against drug trafficking (including the direct and active participation of Afghanistan in this process), terrorism and extremism, the involvement of Gazprom in Pakistani energy projects, the possibility of developing regional trade, the creation of a favourable investment climate and a number of other issues.

The expansion of bilateral relations continued at a similar summit in Sochi in August 2010. At that time during bilateral meetings between the presidents of Russia and Pakistan, opportunities to collaborate in the financial sector were explored (the opening of branches of Russian banks in Pakistan and Pakistani banks in Russia), the admission of Pakistani students to study in Russia and many others.

Russia and Pakistan seem to have realised their mutual role in resolving the issues plaguing the region. Pakistan also sems to be contemplating on the way to lessen her reliance on America and to diversify its support base among the powerful states in the region.

Most important, however, was the decision to hold the first meeting of the Russia-Pakistan Inter-Governmental Commission on Trade, Economic, Scientific, Technological and Cultural Cooperation in September 2010, which took place as planned. On the Russian side, the commission is headed by the Minister for Sport, Tourism and Youth Policy, V.L. Mutko, while the Pakistani side at that time was headed by the Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Hina Rabbani Khar.

The agenda for the 4th quadrilateral summit in Islamabad (2-3 October 2012) included, at the top of the list, discussions regarding the domestic political situation in Afghanistan. However, the meeting was cancelled several days before it was due to start as V.V. Putin was unable to attend the “Dushanbe Four” summit in Islamabad. After the quick cancellation of the summit on 2-3 October 2012, the government of Pakistan diplomatically expressed hope that the Russian president would nevertheless still have the opportunity to visit Pakistan.

As such, there was much speculation in the media that the “Indian factor” had played a major role in the cancellation of V.V. Putin’s visit to Pakistan, with reports that Moscow continues to look at Pakistan through Indian eyes. However, in our opinion, Russia-Pakistan relations will increasingly develop no matter what. All the prerequisites are present for this and there is no doubt that it will have a positive impact on the general situation in Central Asia and on the situation in Afghanistan and surrounding areas.

In this context, a particular mention needs to be made of the relations between the military leaders of the two countries i.e. the visit made to Moscow at the beginning of October 2012 by virtually the most important military official in Pakistan, Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, Chief of Army Staff of the Pakistan Army. During hisvisit, talks took place between General Kayani [COAS Pakistan] and his Russian counterpart, Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Ground Forces Colonel General A.N. Postnikov, as well as the-then Chief of the General Staff N.E. Makarov. A meeting was also held between the Pakistani military leader and the chairman of the State Duma Committee on Defence, V.P. Komoedov. It is possible to suppose that one of the main subjects of the talks was Afghanistan.

The arrival of Air Marshal Tahir Rafiq Butt, chief of the Pakistan Air Force, in Moscow in August 2012 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Russian Air Force also indicates that there are real prospects for military-technical cooperation between Russia and Pakistan. According to Russian experts, at the first stage this cooperation could well be developed within the framework of supplies of Russian dual-use technologies to Pakistan, for example heavy-duty trucks (which can transport both soil and troops across rough terrain, if and when required).

There has already been similar cooperation in the history of Russia-Pakistan relations. Alternatively, the supply of civilian helicopters (which has also happened in the past), are comparatively easy to convert into military transport helicopters.

Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov with his Pakistani counterpart Ms. Hina Rabbani Khar in Moscow, February 2012

It should also be noted that during the visit made by the Russian Foreign Affairs Minister S.V. Lavrov to Pakistan at the beginning of October 2012, three Memorandums of Mutual Understanding were signed – in the areas of metallurgy, energy production and railroad transportation.

There is no doubt that the talks held between the prime ministers of Russia and Pakistan at the beginning of November 2012 in Laos as part of the “Asia-Europe” summit will also promote the development of cooperation between Russia and Pakistan. An unconventional document was signed following the meeting – a Decree on the willingness to sign a Memorandum of Mutual Understanding to modernise a Pakistani metallurgical plant.

During the course of the talks, the heads of the two countries’ governments referred to the trade figure for 2011 (348 million dollars) and expressed regret that this was 40% lower than before the financial crisis (prior to 2008); at that time, the volume of bilateral trade had amounted to approximately 570 million dollars. At a meeting of the Business Council for Cooperation with Pakistan held at the end of December 2012, meanwhile, it was noted that according to preliminary figures, the volume of trade between Russia and Pakistan had shown a steady upward trend overall and in 2012 had reached 660 million dollars. In our view, however, this figure is far from the total wealth of existing possibilities.
* * *
The contours of the geopolitical situation in Asia are literally changing before our very eyes. Large areas of intergovernmental cooperation that convey the ideas of a Greater East Asia and a Central East Asia macro region are taking shape. At an organisational level, this is reflected in the stepping up of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation.

We would like to quote a few words from one of the leading Russian experts on Southern and Central Asia, Professor Vyacheslav Belokrenitsky, who as much as five years ago wrote that, firstly, “strengthening Russia-Pakistan relations would enable Moscow to equalise their chances with China’s in a multilateral dialogue on the expanses of Central and Eastern Asia. Secondly, it would enable Russia to make it clear to India that the time has passed, first and foremost, for its interests in terms of Russia’s priorities regarding South Asia to be taken into account.

If New Delhi is going to strengthen its strategic partnership with the United States by entering into an exclusive long-lasting peaceful nuclear cooperation agreement with them and opening up the way for cooperation with the West in the military-technical sphere, can it rely on the fact that Russia will still refrain from military cooperation with Pakistan that would be to Russia’s advantage?

The point here, of course, is not that the vector of Moscow’s military-technical cooperation itself will change, but that the implementation of certain corrections is possible and even necessary”.

In short, the way for the implementation of new projects between Russia and Pakistan is open. From the point of view of the needs of the Pakistan economy, cooperation with Russia would be most productive in the infrastructure, in energy production, including atomic energy, and in the sectors of communication, metallurgy, irrigation and amelioration. Here is something for both Islamabad and Moscow to think about.

Professor Sergey Kamenev is Director of the Centre for Pakistan Studies, in Moscow, Russia.

Next:: Pakistan can make Russia Queen of Asia

Previous:Pak–Russia Relations

Related Article:

Analysis of Pak-Russia relations (Urdu Column)
Source   Title image   Image next
Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the ‘Wonders of Pakistan’. The contents of this article too are the sole responsibility of the author (s). WoP will not be responsible or liable for any inaccurate or incorrect statement / s contained in this post.
Wonders of Pakistan supports freedom of expression and this commitment extends to our readers as well. Constraints however, apply in case of a violation of WoP Comments Policy. We also moderate hate speech, libel and gratuitous insults.

YOUR COMMENT IS IMPORTANT

DO NOT UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF YOUR COMMENT

We at Wonders of Pakistan use copyrighted material the use of which may not have always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We make such material available to our readers under the provisions of “fair use” only. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than “fair use” you must request permission from the copyright owner.


Pak–Russia Relations


Times change and change demands a re look on country’s long term foreign policy objectives. Apart from all what is on board out of mutually beneficial relations between Russian Federation and Pakistan in different sectors, a fact is that  Russia is our neighboring country.
And with large segments of Muslims living in different regions of Russia, and the newly independent energy rich Central Asian states, the problem of religious and narco terrorism, the vast potential that Pakistan offers to its giant neighbours including India needs to be exploited.
Pakistan offers the most pivotal trade route, opening a new chapter in Pak Russia relations will be the most appropriate and opportune approach, a bold step in the right direction.
·

A RE LOOK ON PAKISTAN’S FOREIGN POLICY

·

by Nayyar Hashmey

·

Historically Russia Pakistan relations have seen many ups and downs, though these have mostly been on the downward side than otherwise. Reason for these falls was primarily the Russian tilt towards India – at the expense of Pakistan.

Though in terms of realpolitik what the successive Pakistani administrations adopted as India-centric policy might have been the correct approach yet seen from pure Pakistan-centric angle, it was never a true patriotic Pakistani approach.

The basic flaw in this policy was to put all our eggs in one basket. So, we thought, by vesting all our interests with the United States, not only shall we assuage our security, but also would make great economic strides, as vis-à-vis the Soviets, Americans were in far more better position to come up to such Pakistani expectations.

While doing so, however, we totally forgot the hard damn fact of life that in intentional relations its pure business that dictates and defines the contours of the foreign policy of a nation. (more…)

The spectre of the Baloch insurgency [3 of 3]


The Saindak project should have been in control of the provincial government since its inception. [Saindak constitutes a Copper-Gold project worth Rs 18 billion]. A little game was played to hand the project to the centre.
In the 80s, when the exploration contracts were being sanctioned, Saindak was leased to the federal government who then gave it to its Mining department, who sub-leased it to its own company, Saindak Metals Limited (SML), who then leased it to the Chinese Metallurgical Construction Company (MCC).
The SML and MCC are 50-50 stakeholders in the project, with provincial royalties coming at 2% of the sale price. Through manipulation of the lease, the centre has mercilessly deprived the Baloch of a constitutional right to the projects profits.
·

THE RESOURCES QUESTION

·

by Hashim bin Rashid

·

A critical point of dispute is the ‘siphoning off of Baloch resources by the Pakistani state.’

It would be useful to break down two existing projects, Saindak and Chamalang, before discussing the broader contours that shape disputes around future projects.

The Saindak project, as revealed by a Mines and Minerals department insider, should have been in control of the provincial government since its inception. Saindak constitutes a Copper-Gold project worth Rs 18 billion. A little game was played to hand the project to the centre.

In the 80s, when the exploration contracts were being sanctioned, Saindak was leased to the federal government who then gave it to its Mining department, who sub-leased it to its own company, Saindak Metals Limited (SML), who then leased it to the Chinese Metallurgical Construction Company (MCC). (more…)

The spectre of the Baloch insurgency [2 of 3]


With number of missing persons in Balochistan on the rise, support for rebels demanding independence has grown in recent years as many in the province feel neglected by the Pakistani state. [Image : Pakistani children with their mothers protest in Quetta, Balochistan raising slogans for peace in the province. Photo by Banaras Khan/AFP/Getty Images]
·

THE POLITICAL CONTOURS

·

by Hashim bin Rashid

·

The first question is to understand the political backdrop to the current insurgency in Balochistan. The suggestion to the reader is to do some digging on 2005 themselves.

That Bugti became an avowed state-enemy and died a martyr to the Baloch cause was not so fated if his history of collusion be gazed. It is an irony of fate that his grandson now is acting spearhead of one of the leading Baloch insurgent groups.

The current Baloch insurgency has centred itself around three figureheads: Dr Allah Nazar Baloch, Harbiyar Marri and Brahamdagh Bugti.

This Baloch insurgency itself also challenges traditional notions of Balochi resistance as sardar driven. The 1973 struggle had a Marxist-Leninist dimension. The current struggle has outreach into the Baloch educated middle class. The figure of Dr Allah Nazar Baloch remains omnipresent. The Bolan Medical College hostels in Quetta , where Allah Nazar graduated, are painted with BSO (Asad) slogans. Their library adorns Allah Nazar’s photos and tributes.

The political core of the movement has been led by the Baloch National Front, a conglomeration of eight organizations, which has opposed parliamentary political participation in Pakistan and has stood by the call for revolutionary politics. The BNF, however, does not include any of the groups directly waging the armed struggle. While sympathies cut across, the BNF is the political front of the current struggle.

Outside the struggle, but part of the voices for provincial autonomy, the National Party and the Baloch National Party (Mengal) are the two Baloch parties that still believe in a working arrangement within the Pakistan. (more…)

%d bloggers like this: