Syrian War Of Lies And Hypocrisy



Hypocrisy is what lies at the bottom ofthe current Syrian Crisis. IF Syria were an ally of Saudi Arabia instead of an ally of Iran. IF Syria were host to a Western naval base instead of a Russian naval base (i.e. if Syria were another Bahrain, which is as repressive but on a smaller Bahraini scale and is facing a peaceful uprising rather than a civil war). IF Syria did not act as a staging base for the transfer of weapons to Hezbollah in Lebanon. IF the Syrian regime did not mouth its age-old rhetoric about Israel but hinted at a deal.
IF all the above were true, then the West would probably deal with the civil war in Syria and with the dictatorial regime in the same way it has been dealing with the popular uprising in Bahrain. The al-Assad family would still be received, wined, and dined in London and Washington just as the repressive al-Khalifa and their al-Saud protectors have been. He is also right about Hezbollah condemning repressions in other parts of the Arab world but not in Syria.
There is plenty of hypocrisy to go around in the Middle East, but most of the hypocrisy belongs to the Western powers and a couple of the most repressive Arab regimes still in power.
·

SYRIAN WAR OF LIES AND HYPOCRISY

Its all about Iran and our desire to crush the Islamic Republic and its infernal nuclear plans – if they exist – and has nothing to do with human rights or the right to life or the death of Syrian babies. Quelle horreur!

·

by Robert Fisk

·

Robert Fisk calls the Syrian Crisis as a war of lies and hypocrisy, but I think Fisk singularly names it so. Fact is that Washington’s wars, everywhere in the world, whether in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen or in any other part of the world are all wars of lies and hypocrisy. Ironically it were we who played into the hands of Washington to pave way for Washington’s hubris as world’s sole super power.

Its not that other wars do not have the elements of lies and hypocrisy, as a matter of fact every war has its own lies and hypocrisy but inspite of all what is thrown into the war talks to turn falsehood into truth, other wars do at least have some semblance of truth in them. But as far as the curret wars are oncerned, they are nothing but lies, lies and lies. [Nayyar] (more…)

Advertisements

US-backed gangs doomed to fail in Syria: Webster Tarpley


·

US-BACKED GANGS DOOMED TO FAIL IN SYRIA: WEBSTER TARPLEY

·

The British Foreign Secretary William Hague has said that the United Kingdom promises to increase its support for the armed gangs fighting the Syrian government.

Interview with Dr. Webster Griffin Tarpley, author and historian.

Source
Disclaimer: The views expressed in this report / article / Op-Ed are the sole responsibility of the author or the source from where this material has been taken. These may not necessarily reflect those of the ‘Wonders of Pakistan’. The contents of this article too are the sole responsibility of the author (s) or the source. WoP will not be responsible or liable for any inaccurate or incorrect statement / s contained in this post.

YOUR COMMENT IS IMPORTANT

DO NOT UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF YOUR COMMENT

Wonders of Pakistan supports freedom of expression and this commitment extends to our readers as well. Constraints however, apply in case of a violation of WoP Comments Policy. We also moderate hate speech, libel and gratuitous insults.
We at Wonders of Pakistan uses copyrighted material the use of which may not have always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We make such material available to our readers under the provisions of “fair use” only. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than “fair use” you must request permission from the copyright owner.

While Memory Serves [1 of 3]


Corpse of a man seen through a wheel of a cart on its way to be cremated after bloody rioting between Hindus and Muslims on 16th August 1946
·

THE GREAT CALCUTTA KILLING

·

by Sir Francis Tuker

·

Lt. General Sir Francis Tuker was the General Officer Commanding of the Eastern Command with headquarters in Calcutta. General Tuker, who was known as a fairly neutral and moderate person, has recorded in his memoir, While Memory Serves, We can certainly consider his account to be credible as he had no axe to grind.

(more…)

Mahesh Bhatt, fasting in Ramadaan


Mahesh Bhatt is a renowned film maker from the Bollywood film industry. He made some super hit movies. Mahesh Bhatt was born on 20 September 1948 and is a prominent Indian film director, producer and screenwriter. Bhatt’s early directional career consisted of acclaimed films, such as ArthSaaranshJanamNaam,Sarhak and Zakhm
Bhatt was born to Nanabhai Bhatt, a Hindu Brahmin and Shirin Mohammed Ali, a Muslim on 20 September 1948. Nanabhai Bhatt was a film director and producer of Hindi and Gujarati films. Mahesh Bhatt was raised by his mother alone as his  father also had another family. He has five siblings, four sisters and one brother Mukesh Bhatt, who is a film producer.
·

COLLECTIVE FORCE

·
by Mahesh Bhatt
·

The Famous Film maker and Human Rights activist MAHESH BHATT observes daily fast (roza) during Ramdan ? Why?

On the 14th day of Ramdan, as I drove back home to break my daily fast (Roza), a beep on my cell phone alerted me to an incoming message. This is what the message said: Hello, Mr. Bhatt, I understand through your utterances and writings that you are not a religious man and you do not believe in the efficacy of prayer. But I have now learned that you maintain Roza in the month of Ramdan. Your actions, Mr. Bhatt, bewilder the Hindus and shock the Muslims as well. May I ask why you keep Roza? (more…)

Published in: on 28/07/2012 at 12:27 pm  Comments (1)  
Tags: ,

Vladimir Putin: Russia and the Changing World [5 of 6]


·

THE EUROPE FACTOR

·

by Vladimir Putin

·

Russia is an inalienable and organic part of Greater Europe and European civilization. Our citizens think of themselves as Europeans. We are by no means indifferent to developments in united Europe.

That is why Russia proposes moving toward the creation of a common economic and human space from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean – a community referred by Russian experts to as “the Union of Europe,” which will strengthen Russia’s potential and position in its economic pivot toward the “new Asia.”

Against the background of the rise of China, India and other new economies, the financial and economic upheavals in Europe – formerly an oasis of stability and order – is particularly worrisome. The crisis that has struck the eurozone cannot but affect Russia’s interests, especially if one considers that the EU is our major foreign economic and trade partner. Likewise, it is clear that the prospects of the entire global economic structure depend heavily on the state of affairs in Europe.

Russia is actively participating in the international effort to support the ailing European economies, and is consistently working with its partners to formulate collective decisions under the auspices of the IMF. Russia is not opposed in principle to direct financial assistance in some cases.

At the same time I believe that external financial injections can only partially solve the problem. A true solution will require energetic, system-wide measures. European leaders face the task of effecting large-scale transformations that will fundamentally change many financial and economic mechanisms to ensure genuine budget discipline. We have a stake in ensuring a strong EU, as envisioned by Germany and France. It is in our interests to realize the enormous potential of the Russia-EU partnership.

The current level of cooperation between Russia and the European Union does not correspond to current global challenges, above all making our shared continent more competitive. I propose again that we work toward creating a harmonious community of economies from Lisbon to Vladivostok, which will, in the future, evolve into a free trade zone and even more advanced forms of economic integration. The resulting common continental market would be worth trillions of euros. Does anyone doubt that this would be a wonderful development, and that it would meet the interests of both Russians and Europeans?

We must also consider more extensive cooperation in the energy sphere, up to and including the formation of a common European energy complex. The Nord Stream gas pipeline under the Baltic Sea and the South Stream pipeline under the Black Sea are important steps in that direction. These projects have the support of many governments and involve major European energy companies. Once the pipelines start operating at full capacity, Europe will have a reliable and flexible gas-supply system that does not depend on the political whims of any nation. This will strengthen the continent’s energy security not only in form but in substance. This is particularly relevant in the light of the decision of some European states to reduce or renounce nuclear energy.

The Third Energy Package, backed by the European Commission and aimed at squeezing out integrated Russian companies, is frankly not conducive to stronger relations between Russia and the EU. Considering the growing instability of energy suppliers that could act as an alternative to Russia, the package aggravates the systemic risks to the European energy sector and scares away potential investors in new infrastructure projects. Many European politicians have been critical of the package in their talks with me. We should summon the courage to remove this obstacle to mutually beneficial cooperation.

I believe that genuine partnership between Russia and the European Union is impossible as long as there are barriers that impede human and economic contacts, first and foremost visa requirements. The abolition of visas would give powerful impetus to real integration between Russia and the EU, and would help expand cultural and business ties, especially between medium-sized and small businesses. The threat to Europeans from Russian economic migrants is largely imagined. Our people have opportunities to put their abilities and skills to use in their own country, and these opportunities are becoming ever more numerous.

In December 2011 we agreed with the EU on “joint steps” toward a visa-free regime. They can and should be taken without delay. We should continue to actively pursue this goal.

RUSSIAN AMERICAN AFFAIRS

In recent years a good deal has been done to develop Russian-American relations. Even so, we have not managed to fundamentally change the matrix of our relations, which continue to ebb and flow. The instability of the partnership with America is due in part to the tenacity of some well-known stereotypes and phobias, particularly the perception of Russia on Capitol Hill. But the main problem is that bilateral political dialogue and cooperation do not rest on a solid economic foundation. The current level of bilateral trade falls far short of the potential of our economies. The same is true of mutual investments. We have yet to create a safety net that would protect our relations against ups and downs. We should work on this.

Nor is mutual understanding strengthened by regular U.S. attempts to engage in “political engineering,” including in regions that are traditionally important to us and during Russian elections.

As I’ve said before, U.S. plans to create a missile defense system in Europe give rise to legitimate fears in Russia. Why does that system worry us more than others? Because it affects the strategic nuclear deterrence forces that only Russia possesses in that theatre, and upsets the military-political balance established over decades.

The inseparable link between missile defense and strategic offensive weapons is reflected in the New START treaty signed in 2010. The treaty has come into effect and is working fairly well. It is a major foreign policy achievement. We are ready to consider various options for our joint agenda with the Americans in the field of arms control in the coming period. In this effort we must seek to balance our interests and renounce any attempts to gain one-sided advantages through negotiations.

In 2007, during a meeting with President Bush in Kennebunkport, I proposed a solution to the missile defense problem, which, if adopted, would have changed the customary character of Russian-American relations and opened up a positive path forward. Moreover, if we had managed to achieve a breakthrough on missile defense, this would have opened the floodgates for building a qualitatively new model of cooperation, similar to an alliance, in many other sensitive areas.

It was not to be. Perhaps it would be useful to look back at the transcripts of the talks in Kennebunkport. In recent years the Russian leadership has come forward with other proposals to resolve the dispute over missile defense. These proposals still stand.

I am loath to dismiss the possibility of reaching a compromise on missile defense. One would not like to see the deployment of the American system on a scale that would demand the implementation of our declared countermeasures.

I recently had a talk with Henry Kissinger. I meet with him regularly. I fully share this consummate professional’s thesis that close and trusting interactions between Moscow and Washington are particularly important in periods of international turbulence.

In general, we are prepared to make great strides in our relations with the U.S., to achieve a qualitative breakthrough, but on the condition that the Americans are guided by the principles of equal and mutually respectful partnership.

Contd…

Next: Russia and Her Outreach to the Global Market

Page    1     2    3    4    5   6

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this report / article / Op-Ed are the sole responsibility of the author or the source from where this material has been taken. These may not necessarily reflect those of the ‘Wonders of Pakistan’. The contents of this article too are the sole responsibility of the author (s) or the source. WoP will not be responsible or liable for any inaccurate or incorrect statement / s contained in this post.

YOUR COMMENT IS IMPORTANT

DO NOT UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF YOUR COMMENT

We do not claim exclusive rights on all articles, images or videos published on this site. The sources we use to create our articles, images, videos etc. are credited with a proper linkback. However, we do host material from unknown authors we receive via mails, from friends and our readers. If you own copyrights to some material and you want us to remove it from our pages, contact us to claim your ownership and we will either credit you, or if you wish – completely remove the content.
%d bloggers like this: