In defence of General Kayani


He is probably the first chief who has admitted that the army has committed mistakes; all other chiefs have justified army takeovers, citing different reasons. He is trying to change the course and avoid mistakes of the past, and yet no chief during his service was criticised the way General Kayani has been.
The army as an institution is being blamed for acts committed by past generals.
·

DEMONIZING THE ARMED FORCES: GOOD FOR NOTHING

·

by Asad Munir

·

The army and its agencies have been playing a political role since 1958, if not before that. It has not even been five years since the last military ruler relinquished power. In the country’s 65 years of history, the army has directly ruled for more than 33 years and indirectly, maybe more.

It has been formulating or influencing the making of foreign policies related to certain countries since independence. To expect that the army should now withdraw from the political scene is desirable but not practical. It is rather a wish based on idealism.

To compare our army chief with those of other democratic countries is also unrealistic. Comparing the army with other institutions of the state and arguing that they chose the profession of soldiering and that they are being paid for their job may not be a very rational approach, keeping the nature of their task in view. The mere fact that General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani’s statement kept all media amply focused demonstrates that the army is still considered by all to be a major player in our politics, even if it is undesirable.

When General Kayani took command of the army, about 19 administrative units of Fata and Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa were completely or partially under the control of Taliban. Now, there are two.

The army is fighting the longest war in its history, in which it has lost about 5,000 soldiers and over 800 have been rendered disabled for life. It is a war not owned by many Pakistanis. No previous chief has commanded an army in such difficult times as General Kayani. No army chief has seen beheadings of his soldiers with their sacrifices not recognised by the nation.

General Kayani shoulders the difficult task to motivate them, keep them committed to their goals and prevent any division in the rank and files of the army. Since 2008, many in this country have been inviting General Kayani to intervene in political affairs and get rid of this government. However, he has refused and also convinced his corps commanders that they should not do so.

He is probably the first chief who has admitted that the army has committed mistakes; all other chiefs have justified army takeovers, citing different reasons. He is trying to change the course and avoid mistakes of the past, and yet no chief during his service was criticised the way General Kayani has been. The army as an institution is being blamed for acts committed by past generals.

The perception that the chief is the sole decision-making authority may not be true in all cases. There are nine corps commanders having their own opinions but the chief faces the brunt of the negative onslaught by the media, also with the responsibility of responding and pacifying those under his command.

Why is the army different from other institutions that are ridiculed by the media? Soldiers do not put their lives at stake only for money; there are additional factors which motivate them to fight, such as pride, honour, ghairat, patriotism, belief in a cause, recognition, comradeship and unit cohesion, etc. High morale matters to them. Unit cohesion is the trust between leaders and the led.

Creating an impression that the army has good junior officers and soldiers but that senior officers have always let them down is undermining this very basic concept. The army traditionally does not support individuals, be it the ex-army chief, which is why General (retd) Pervez Musharraf is not in the country, for which he may not be very pleased with General Kayani.

To blame the institution as a whole for the wrongdoing of some individuals affects the morale of the troops.

The Afghan Taliban captured Kabul in 1996 and Islamists took control of Timbuktu in April 2012. In both cases, their armies had disintegrated. We face serious threat from the Taliban; they want to take over this country through armed jihad. The army is the institution preventing them from fulfilling their evil designs. Do not demoralise the troops by criticising the army as an institution; focus on individual culprits. God forbid, if there is a division in the army, it will lead to anarchy and consequently, no other institution of the state will survive.

More from Asad Munir on Wonders of Pakistan 

When will we stop blaming the rest of the world?

The writer is a retired brigadier who has served in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa and FATA. He can be reached at: asad.munir@tribune.com.pk

Source  Title image

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the ‘Wonders of Pakistan’. The contents of this article too are the sole responsibility of the author(s). WoP will not be responsible or liable for any inaccurate or incorrect statements contained in this post.

YOUR COMMENT IS IMPORTANT

DO NOT UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF YOUR COMMENT

Wonders of Pakistan supports freedom of expression and this commitment extends to our readers as well. Constraints however, apply in case of a violation of WoP Comments Policy. We also moderate hate speech, libel and gratuitous insults. 
We at Wonders of Pakistan use copyrighted material the use of which may not have always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We make such material available to our readers under the provisions of “fair use” only. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than “fair use” you must request permission from the copyright owner.

Age of Darkness


In a free economy, the banks that invested trillions in risky mortgages and other fool’s gold, would have taken the hit. Instead, however, what happened is that the American taxpayers took the hit, paid the bill, and cleaned up their mess – and were condemned to suffer record unemployment, massive foreclosures, and the kind of despair that kills the soul.

·

WHAT AILS OUR DEMOCRACY

·

by Humayun Gauhar

·

Everything they accused BCCI of but couldn’t prove has been done by western banks millions of times over – and more. The mindboggling criminality and plunder that is surfacing in Western banks makes BCCI look angelic. Why are they not being given a mercy killing and their executives sent to prison? Not amusing.

The time to make money is when there’s blood on the streets,” said Lord Rothschild. Fine for those who are that way inclined, but how to survive in times of madness?

Writing gets you nothing, except that it’s one elixir of the soul. It hardly puts food on the table unless you write a bestseller. I have, but it was someone else’s. So I became a businessman as a compulsion, for survival’s sake. Don’t get me wrong. Being your own boss is fun as long as you don’t become hostage to wealth, for that detracts from love of God.

I’ve seen as many ups and downs as anyone, though not as intense because I’m smalltime compared to the Rothschilds of Europe and Pakistan. Today, survival – or lack thereof – stares us in the face; another ‘down’ looms if we don’t keep our wits about us and learn to roll with the punches. What to do?

“Go into three things, young lady and gentleman,” is my answer – medicine, education and food and drink, but not of the bootlegging kind lest you attract suo moto notices. If any of these is your passion, as food and education are of mine, so much the better, for it’s like marrying the woman you love. If money is your passion no matter from what source earned, get into any branch of government or its institutions. If you are a mug, set up a newspaper, sell lower than its cost and then beg for advertisements to make up the deficit and erode your independence.

People can do without education or medicine – as the majority has been forever anyway – but never without food and water. Medicine I am not qualified to do. Thus it was that I started a school called FIRST some months ago and my new restaurant ‘Chand Tara’ is opening in Islamabad today. From part of their profits I hope to start affordable schools and food establishments for the less privileged if God gives me time.

If the luckier amongst us don’t help the less lucky, who will, for our governments certainly will not? You cannot fill stomachs on empty rhetoric and hollow promises signifying nothing but bombast and bluster. 

I say to those living abroad and want excitement that doesn’t strain the intellect, come to Pakistan. Those seeking intellectual excitement should also come to Pakistan to observe the lack of it, particularly amongst our rulers. You’ll get it by the sack load. There’s never a dull moment here.

If you have a sense of humour and don’t take the imposter called ‘life’ on earth more seriously than it should be, you will find much to amuse you. Nothing keeps one going better than a healthy sense of humour, especially in bad times.

Last week we talked of change. This week let’s talk of darkness. There are two kinds of darkness, mental and physical. Mental darkness begets physical darkness. Physical darkness in turn begets mental darkness. It’s a symbiotic relationship, each begetting and feeding off the other. Both beget lack of emancipation and retrogression. We call it ‘Jihalat’. 

The other day I heard the hypocritical lament that we lacked electricity because our governments hadn’t built enough dams. Where were you, Sir, when Musharraf wanted to build the Kalabagh Dam but your beloved political leaders of Sindh and KPK raised a storm, threatening to blow it up if they tried? You supported them, remember, even though it’s difficult to find anyone today who admits to it. Its always someone else’s fault, not our own. Until we own up to our own culpability, especially those amongst us who go as ‘educated’ we will never beat regression and darkness. Now you understand what the saying “As you sow so shall you reap” means?

Three provinces were dead against Kalabagh: the Pathans had been brainwashed that Nowshera would drown and Sindhis had been convinced that Punjab would ‘steal’ their water. Well, Nowshera drowned last year anyway while the Punjab has been doing fine without the dam’s water and feeding the rest of the country. None bothered to think what Punjab would do with so much water. Drown? It’s the electricity crisis stupid, and water is what we need most to generate it. Politicians made full capital out of it just to do Musharraf down and get another chance to misgovern and deprive us even more, totally unconcerned with the damage they were doing to their country in their sick pursuit of power. You have to draw the line when it comes to choosing between your own good and the greater good – but not those seeking power at any cost.

Shameless is the manner in which the Nawaz League is attacking Imran Khan’s free cancer hospital for the poor only to arrest his political ascent, caring not a whit that they are damaging a great national institution. If it falters what will cancer patients who cannot afford such expensive treatment do? Go and live in Raiwind with Nawaz Sharif’s honchos for doctors?

Why do people living in houses made of such thin glass unleash their character assassins on good people who have done sterling work? Don’t they realize that when the counterattack comes they will find nowhere to hide?

There’s no point in gloating that half of India lost electricity due to long-term stupidity. We are no less stupid for not admitting our flaws but pointing to the greater flaws of others, as if being less bad off is a great achievement. India has less electric generation capacity than its demand. We have more and still we have load shedding. Which is more stupid?

Corruption is not unique to Pakistan. It is everywhere. The difference is that when it comes to corruption damaging their own country they draw the line. Not our corrupt. They go the whole hog and let the devil take the hindmost. The devil does and we are left with nothing.

That is when countries, societies and economies collapse while the world moves on leaving idiots in the dustbin of history. What we do have is due to our own survivability, no thanks to our leaders.

It’s not just us. It’s happened to greedy western bankers too who crossed the line dividing self-aggrandizement from national damage. They took booty from a trusting, unsuspecting, gullible public that has been sold the confidence tricksters’ motto, “In banks we trust.” It now is: “In banks we distrust.”

Though the global economy has been stung and placed on the deathbed by these trickster-fraudster bankers, they have got away lightly. Why? Because heads of many central bankers and regulators are commercial bankers too – they came from banks and to banks they will return. Many knew what was going on, particularly the Governor of the Bank of England and the Chairman of the privately owned Federal Reserve, yet they kept mum.

These are people who drive us insane with their holier than thou attitude. And, yes, many public officials had their hands in the till too. They went so far in taking booty that they have brought the global financial system to collapse. Corruption is one thing, loot and plunder quite another. What our rulers and the West’s bankers, financial gurus and geniuses have done is loot and plunder.

Compare this to the forced closure of BCCI in 1991, a Muslim-owned bank run largely by Pakistanis. None of the charges leveled against it have been proved in 21 years. Virtually all the money has been recovered minus the huge amount taken by the liquidators. Conclusion:

BCCI was not bankrupt. Not one cent of money laundering has been proved: the spectacle of drugs money laundering they created in Miami was an immoral sting operation conducted by US Customs Intelligence. All they proved is what we already know, that nearly every man has a price. Great.

The inescapable conclusion has to be that the forced closure of BCCI was illegal, immoral and criminal. Someone should take those who deliberately misused their authority to forcibly close down a perfectly good bank to court. Not only did they murder a good institution, they caused depositors heartache, incredible losses to shareholders and deprived over 16,000 people of livelihood.

But why would they care for a Muslim bank with largely Muslim employees? In any case, after 9/11 it would have been obliterated anyway.

Everything they accused BCCI of but couldn’t prove has been done by western banks millions of times over – and more. The mindboggling criminality and plunder that is surfacing in Western banks makes BCCI look angelic. Why are they not being given a mercy killing and their executives sent to prison? Not amusing.

More from Humayun Gauhar on Wonders of Pakistan

1. Jihad and Anti-Jihad 2. The Worm Does Turn 3. Peace the only option 4.US Aid To Pakistan: Numbers Contradict American Statements 5. Decade of Destruction 6. Delusions of being Islamic
Humayun Gauhar is an accomplished writer. He comes on talk shows and is very forthright with his opinions. He is also the Editor in chief of Blue Chip Magazine. Contact him at humayun.gauhar786@gmail
Source,  Title image
Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the ‘Wonders of Pakistan’. The contents of this article too are the sole responsibility of the author (s). WoP will not be responsible or liable for any inaccurate or incorrect statement / s contained in this post.

YOUR COMMENT IS IMPORTANT

DO NOT UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF YOUR COMMENT

Wonders of Pakistan supports freedom of expression and this commitment extends to our readers as well. Constraints however, apply in case of a violation of WoP Comments Policy. We also moderate hate speech, libel and gratuitous insults.
We at Wonders of Pakistan use copyrighted material the use of which may not have always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We make such material available to our readers under the provisions of “fair use” only. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than “fair use” you must request permission from the copyright owner.

Are we all misunderstood?


The fact is that politics and democracy are not all about holding on to high offices and political power.  The democratic doctrine is about serving people with selflessness, tireless hard work, vision and dedication to nation-building, uplifting the nation with moral-ethical values, judicious political judgments, economic sustainability and going forward on a quest to explore and realise the best in human nature and the environment in which humanity exists.

·

WHAT AILS OUR DEMOCRACY

·

by Dr. Haider Mehdi

·

Dr. Haider Mehdi has forceful pen. Every punch he uses, directly hits target he chooses.

In the following post, he has elaborated upon the causes of democracy failure in Pakistan. Simultaneously he urges us, all Pakistanis to stand up and fight for our rights. And the prime mode of acsertainig our rights is to get rid of the current corrupt coterie governing this land of the pure.

Dr. Mehdi concludes :

Our contemporary ruling elite is completely oblivious to what is required (of them) because they do not comprehend what democracy is all about. It’s a sad story! Are not we all, our aspirations, our hopes, our destiny, our future, our present, our past, victims of our own ruling elite’s merciless selfishness?

I submit that we all, as a nation, have been tragically misunderstood, deliberately and callously, by our ruling elite.

Most certainly, they do not deserve a second chance at political power. It’s time for them to face the music!

The nation must rise to control its own destiny and be understood emphatically. [Nayyar]

(more…)

Who am I? What do I stand for?


How long can a nation live on false promises and on the pretext of a government “of the people, by the people, for the people”? Indeed, the flawed democracy in Pakistan begs the nation to ask hard and puzzling questions as to why we are where we are today – at the brink of social, cultural, economic, political and spiritual decay. In today’s volatile Pakistan, every citizen needs to ask herself / himself a fundamental question: “Who Am I?” For without a thorough self-reflection, a sense of self-awareness and a conscientious effort on the part of each citizen, the speedy decline of our civilization will continue unabated.

·

Live on the great promise? Well, you can believe it;

  I’d have died of joy had The Great One proved the word!”

[Mirza Ghalib – translation by William Stafford]

·

LET  POLITICAL MORALISM STEER OUR DECISION MAKING

·

by Dr. Haider Mehdi

·

For how long can a nation can live on false promises and on the pretext of a government “of the people, by the people, for the people”? Indeed, the flawed democracy in Pakistan begs the nation to ask hard and puzzling questions as to why we are where we are today – at the brink of social, cultural, economic, political and spiritual decay. (more…)

Leaders of Pakistan


Nearly a decade ago Gen.Pervez Musharaf and George W. Bush agreed a secret deal allowing U.S. forces to conduct raids inside Pakistan particularly if they found Bin laden.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1385036/Osama-bin-Laden-dead-Pakistan-unmasks-CIA-chief-masterminded-hit.html#ixzz1rHcty7xV
According to London’s daily mail, both secretly agreed to allow unilateral American action against Osama Bin Laden if he was ever found in Pakistan. And Pakistan agreed to oppose the raid as a smokescreen to cover up the agreement. A former senior U.S. official, said to have inside knowledge of counter-terrorism operations, told the Guardian newspaper that ‘there was an agreement’ between former U.S. President George Bush and Pakistan’s then leader General Pervez Musharraf. ‘If we knew where Osama was, we were going to come and get him,’ the anonymous official said. ‘The Pakistanis would put up a hue and cry, but they wouldn’t stop us.’
So God knows how many more secret deals were made by the ex dictator to the detriment of country’s national interests.·
·

THEY SELL THE COUNTRY &

 THEY SELL IT DIRT CHEAP

·

by Nayyar Hashmey

·

 In our issue of December 8, 2011 we put up a post titled The Fatally Flawed Northern Distribution Nightmare  in two parts.

The writer in his post highlighted the risks invloved in US position on supplies to the US forces stationed in Afghanistan. In the end the writer David Trilling concluded that all said and done, US has had no other option but to revert to Pakistan for the ongoing war in Afghanistan. As says Trilling in that post ‘Pakistan is not the problem but a solution to the problem’. Unfortunately this aspect has never been assessed by our leadership. All what they have been doing is to negotiate superficial, personal [family] oriented deals with their counterparts in Washington… And these deals never did help the people. (more…)