Who was behind the attack on Pakistan’s naval base?


The deadly and brazen attack on Pakistan Navy’s base in Karachi on May 22 has dealt another humiliating blow to the reputation and morale of Pakistan’s armed services. According to the initial accounts the small group of militants, as few as six, who attacked the PNS Mehran naval aviation base in Karachi gave its defenders no time.

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 WHITHER PAKISTAN!

A CLASSIC REPEAT OF 1971?

by Yousuf Nazar

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The deadly and brazen attack on Pakistan Navy’s base in Karachi on May 22 has dealt another humiliating blow to the reputation and morale of Pakistan’s armed services.

According to the initial accounts the small group of militants, as few as six, who attacked the PNS Mehran naval aviation base in Karachi gave its defenders no time.

“You cannot imagine how quick they were,” said a Pakistani security official who asked not to be named. “When they entered, one of the Navy commandos saw them and tried to react.”

He never got the chance. “It was a single shot in the darkness which took his arm off,” the official said. “You can imagine how good they were.” The commando died on the spot.

A security official said the assailants were dressed in black with night-vision goggles and armed with Russian hand grenades, rocket launchers, assault rifles and suicide vests. Interior Minister Rehman Malik said they looked like Star Wars characters.

A BBC report has lent further credence to the “Star Wars” description of the attackers. The BBC said that the terrorists wore combat uniforms, had intricate knowledge of the base, and just aimed RPGs at  the P-3C Orion reconnaissance aircrafts {supplied by the U.S. for about $35 million each} parked on the tarmac.  P3C Orion is a four-engine turbo-prop, anti-submarine and maritime surveillance aircraft.  It is almost out of question that India could be behind this. Then who else may have the motive to destroy these planes since the attackers were apparently not interested in shooting people.  They did take some Chinese technicians hostage according to a report in the New York Times. (more…)

Deosai Plains – Fact Sheet


Heading west from Sadpara we move towards Deosai. From Deosai northwards reach Upper Astore Valley through Chakor Pass located at 4,266 meters. This is the most impressive part of our Deosai adventure, with deep blue Sheosar Lake, nestled in the pass that offers picture-book scenery. [Above a view of the enchanting Sheosar lake in Deosai. To view full size, click on the image] 
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DEOSAI PLAINS  FACT SHEET

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by Jalal HB

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Pakistan is a God gifted land. It abounds in natural treasures and breathtaking landscapes. One such of these are the Deosai Plains – spread over an area of some 3,000 kilometres. After Tibet, Deosai is the second highest plateau in the world. The endless and awesome Deosai Plains are located on the boundary between the Karakorum and West Tibetan Plateau alpine steppe. A part of Pakistan’s  Gilgit Baltistan region, the plains at an average height of 4,114 metres above mean sea level, are rich in
unique type of flora and fauna found nowhere else in the world. (more…)

The Wonders of Deosai Plains


 The Deosai Plateau, known as the highest plateau in the world is located at the boundary of the Karakoram and the western Himalayas. Deosai Plains are a backwoods country at about 30 kilometres from Skardu. It is a beautiful summer pasture with greenery and countless species of Fauna & flora. The view of the Karakorum Range from the top of the 4,785 meterpass is legendary. Apart from fairies, this plateau is the habitat of the greatly threatened Himalayan Brown Bear and many other wild animals.[To view full size, click on the image] 
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THE DEOSAI

[NORTHERN AREAS]

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by S.A.J. Shirazi

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All those who take their chance to Siachin sector (via Skardu, the valleys of Shigar,Khaplu, Kharmong, Rondu and onwards), purposefully visit to see northern areas of Pakistan and or plan to have rendezvous with fairies do pass though Deosai Plains, a plateau among high mountains and unique landscape in the world.

I first got acquainted with the area when Siachin sector was active. Later, whenever I visited the area, one plan that I always had in mind was to meet the fairies there.

Baikal is what I am reminded of whenever I see the Sadpara Lake situated at a short drive (an easy walk) south of Skardu. The walk along the torrent is more pleasant and shorter than following the jeep road. The lake surrounded by bare mountains abounds in fish, and is an ideal place just to sit there and think of fairies. Who wants fishing any way!

A meditating Buddha carved on the northern face of a large rock about half way between Skardu and Sadpara is of interest mostly for the foreign tourists. It is off the road across the Sadpara stream: cross a footbridge over the stream and up to the slope on the other side at Manthal. The Buddha, carved on a big rust brown rock, perhaps in the 7th century, is the same style as one at Kargha near Gilgit.

The morning lights over Deosai beacon you to explore the land of the giants. The mother nature plays the symphony on the canvas of world’s second highest plains (4200m everage). Its both mystic and mysterious. Nature blends this mystique and the mystery, around Deosai’s exotic wildlife, around the melody of songs that reverberate the environs here, its roaring rivers and above all its unique brown bear roaming proudly over the plains of Deosai.

The Deosai Plateau, known as the highest plateau in the world is located at the boundary of the Karakoram and the western Himalayas. Deosai Plains are a backwoods country at about 30 kilometres from Skardu. It is a beautiful summer pasture with greenery and countless species of fauna and flora. The view of the Karakorum Range from the top of the 4,785 meterpass is legendary. Apart from fairies, this plateau is the habitat of the greatly threatened Himalayan Brown Bear and many other wild animals. Although few people will see a bear, quite a few are said to make their homes in the heart of the plateau. At an average elevation of 3,500 meter, Deosai officially is a National Park and protected area for wildlife.

(more…)

In US-Pakistan relations stability means obedience: Chomsky


 “The US and its imperial allies will always prevent a functional democracy in the Middle East including Pakistan, because that places the region beyond their control. They like democracy on paper but the fear of ‘real’ democracy in other parts of the world is cemented in the US psyche. It would mean a severe lapse of control where they are involved”. With regard to Pakistan, the country’s leaders severely lacked commitment to the land and to its people. “My late friend Eqbal Ahmed always used to say there can be no revolution or change without a genuine commitment to the cause and that is lacking in Pakistan. Many don’t care if the country goes down the drain as long as they can profit from the fall out,” [Noam Chomsky]
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STABILITY MEANS U.S. OBEDIENCE

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“Stability to the US means obedience. As long as Pakistan is obedient it will be considered a stable ally,” said MIT professor emeritus Noam Chomsky on Wednesday. (more…)

The Economist attacks India in censorship row


 
 Indian customs officers ordered that 28,000 copies of the British weekly magazine should have stickers placed over a diagram showing how control of Kashmir is split between India, Pakistan and China. Both India and Pakistan claim the whole of the Himalayan region and have gone to war twice over its control since 1947. New Delhi imposes tight restrictions on all maps, insisting they show all of Kashmir as being part of India. “India is meant to be a democracy that approves of freedom of speech,” John Micklethwait, editor-in-chief of The Economist, told AFP. “But they take a much more hostile attitude on this matter than either Pakistan or China.”
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KASHMIR AND THE INDIAN CENSOR

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The Economist magazine has accused India of hostile censorship after officials prevented the distribution of the latest edition because of a map showing the disputed borders of Kashmir.

Customs officers ordered that 28,000 copies of the weekly magazine should have stickers placed over a diagram showing how control of Kashmir is split between India, Pakistan and China.

Both India and Pakistan claim the whole of the Himalayan region and have gone to war twice over its control since 1947.

New Delhi imposes tight restrictions on all maps, insisting they show all of Kashmir as being part of India.

“India is meant to be a democracy that approves of freedom of speech,” John Micklethwait, editor-in-chief of The Economist, told AFP. “But they take a much more hostile attitude on this matter than either Pakistan or China.”

He added: “This is an act of censorship, and many wise and sensible voices in India see it has no point.”

The map appears next to the front-page story of the latest edition of the magazine on “The world’s most dangerous border” between India and Pakistan.

The Economist still hoped to distribute the edition once the stickers had been added.

Kashmir is divided between the two nuclear-armed neighbours along a de facto border known as the Line of Control. It closely matches the frontline of fighting at the end of the first India-Pakistan war over Kashmir in 1947.

“The map is impartial, accurate and fair. We show everyone’s claims, and it is also realistic as it shows where the unofficial border actually falls,” Micklethwait said.

The magazine has clashed in the past with Indian authorities.

In December an entire issue of the Economist was pulped on the censors’ orders over a map of the region, and its publishers predicted the May 21 edition was likely to hit trouble.

“As a point of principle we are against changing our articles,” said Micklethwait, speaking by telephone from London on Monday. “So we mentioned the problem in a piece pointing out how touchy India is on this.”

The magazine also printed a warning saying the map was likely to be censored. “Unlike their government, we think our Indian readers can face political reality,” it said.

Source

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