Chaudhry Map


The journey embraces you with lovely colours, atmosphere, people and bits and pieces of history. And, there is no hassle anywhere in the way.
As harvest approaches, the traveller, especially in the irrigated tracts, rides through endless expanses of waving crops of different shades of colour, out of which the villages seem to rise like islets in an ocean of green. After the harvest all is changed: the dull brown of the fields is relieved by the trees, solitary or in groves and avenues, and by the hamlets and village ponds.
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TRAVELLING ALONG THE LBDC COUNTRY SIDE

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by S A J Shirazi

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While travelling, off the National Highway, not only you travel in soot free and serene environment but you see more too. Riding my trusted old motorbike on Band Patri (not a thoroughfare) of Lower Bari Doab Canal (LBDC) from Sahiwal to Balloki Headworks, many new and interesting things come in the way, which normally remain hidden from commuters on the National Highway or travellers in the area.

The journey embraces you with lovely colours, atmosphere, people and bits and pieces of history. And, there is no hassle anywhere in the way.

Rich, ripe wheat harvest

As harvest approaches, the traveller, especially in the irrigated tracts, rides through endless expanses of waving crops of different shades of colour, out of which the villages seem to rise like islets in an ocean of green. After the harvest all is changed: the dull brown of the fields is relieved by the trees, solitary or in groves and avenues, and by the hamlets and village ponds.

I took the side route and got onto the LBDC from Sahiwal — the city famous for greenery and best breed of mammals. The first thing along the LBDC that attracted my attention was Mandi Maweshian (animal market) near Okara — one of the largest in the country.

It is a complete bazaar where a large number of fine quality animals changes hand every month. You can find makeshift hotels (with arrangements for night stay), veterinary doctors, milk and fodder shops and even provision stores. “It is a complete market that keeps moving from one place to another as per its permanent schedule,” told me an astute manager, who establishes a hotel wherever the market goes.

Ripe sugarcane field en route my journey along the LBDC.

“We have beoparis (businessmen) from Karachi to Peshawar, local farmers as well as people working in the market as our customers,” he added. Another shopkeeper informed, “Farmers sell their live stock here and buy provisions for their homes.” The market has its own unique culture.

Near Renala, you see one of the first Hydroelectric Power Stations constructed in the Subcontinent. Sir Ganga Ram, an Engineer and famous Philanthropist had built this Power Station in 1925 in order to irrigate about 70,000 acres of agricultural land that is higher than the normal level in the area and could not be irrigated through the LBDC.

Ganga Ram forked the canal, built the Power Station and installed five motors to generate electricity. The then Governor Punjab, Sir William Malcolm Hailey laid down its foundation stone of the station on March 22, 1925.

Engineer in charge of the station Mr. Iqbal explained the working of the station and briefed about its excellent performance despite the old vintage. The Power Station is not linked with National Electric Grid and only provides electricity for the five pumping stations for lifting the water from the LBDC. The Power Station remained with Power and Works Department till 1958 when it was taken over by WAPDA. Why not more similar hydroelectric stations in the country? The question keeps coming back to my mind.

First sight of the Power Station reminded me of Venice City. The power house building seems to be floating on water. The canal is covered with trees up and down stream. There is a small white mosque inside the canal in front of the station building. Green areas adjoining the station are very restful.

Just about three Kilometres from Renala, you see a huge colonial era mansion standing tall in the fields. This used to be headquarters of the Renala Estate — the land leased by Major D. H. Venrenen in 1913 on the condition of horse breeding (ghori paal). The company had been producing very fine breed of horses in the past. Villa — a symbol of the past era — is still owned by the family of landlady T. F. L. Taylor.

That is the place from where my real ‘hardship by choice’ started. I was travelling on a rural route, seeing the path but not knowing what was coming next. Not knowing what one is going to see ahead is sometime inspiring. But, about 11 Kilometres from Power Station, rear tyre of my bike went flat.

There was no place in sight from where I could get it fixed. Advised by Chiragh Din, a local, I waited for the ‘help’ to come and we talked.

Chiragh Din, relaxed and amiable old man who was fishing asked about my destination, purpose of journey and why I was travelling on a bike. He did not seem convinced with my answers once I told him that I am travelling just to see the area. He was surprised instead. I enjoyed talking to him though. He was so candid and frank about every thing he said.

It pays to get out into the countryside and talk to ordinary people. They are eager to help — on their own expense — when you ask any body. I found volunteer ‘guides’ who were forth coming with wealth of information from history to myths prevalent in the area. But ‘chaudhry map’ is as vague in Punjab about the distances as is anywhere else in Pakistan. I learnt not to rely on chaudhry map during my days in the army but still cannot resist asking.

Where is village Thatta Ghulam? Ask any body when you are riding a motorbike with haversack and water bottle on your sides. The replies will always be same: nearby. Apart from seeing pure rural built heritage, I was surprised to find a Solar Energy Station working in village Thatta Ghulam that is without electric connection.

The ionic counter point is the lack of attention in maintaining the bits and pieces of unique heritage – the resource base of tourism industry. The neglect may be attributed to lack of awareness, education, coordination between authorities, economic constrains and or simply the natural hazards. The magnificent vistas of a land of plans, fields and orchards have to be opened to the rest of the world.

There is a need for information in the form of travel guide writing, pure travel journalism, travel book writing and geographical description in form of maps. No ordinary coldness of phrasing can express the surprise and delight, with which one makes acquaintance with the rural sites. Their perspective gives you a wonderful sense of being there. In fact, that is my recommendation: be there.

Mechanical and animal transport, plying on Pakistani highways and roads has almost equal right of the way. But, I was greatly pleased once a Tonga appeared on a track coming out of sugarcane and blooming mustard fields. A bit of usual haggling about the charges, and I loaded my bike on the back and rode a sturdy Tonga to reach Akhtarabad — the nearest place on National Highway with vulcanization facilities. It took me three hours to get on to my way to Balloki headworks.

Near Balloki Headworks on River Ravi, one passes through a wide water reservoir that looks like a lake. In winters, this lake is full of native waterfowls. Flocks of Wild Ducks, Cranes, Strokes and black winged Stilts are the commonest sights in the area. The fish kababs at Balloki Headworks are a speciality and culinary delight.

I had a dinner break at Balloki, treated myself with fish kababs — fresh from the river — and proceeded to National Highway for onwards journey to Lahore via more familiar route.

S A J Shirazi is a Lahore based writer, blogger and speaker. Shirazi has authored two books (Izhar, Ret Pe Tehreer) and translated Din Mein Charagh by Abbas Khan into Light Within.

More from S. A. J. Shirazi on Wonders of Pakistan

1. Who Owns Harand Fort? – Pakistan 2. King’s Treatment  3. Hiran Minar 4. Around Abbotabad 5. The Wonders of Deosai Plains

You might also like:  

1. Rural Pakistan: More Colors, More Scenes [in four parts] 2. Colors of Punjab, Rural Pakistan [in four parts] 3. Life in a Pakistani Village
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Rural Pakistan: More Colors, More Scenes [4 of 4]


A local version of the Merry Go Round is one of the most popular enjoyment for village kids. The carousel carries the mark from “London to America”, a fascinating invitation to children. “Have a ride in my carousel, reach London and then to America”. OK guys, want to go to London? come on. Try it!
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RURAL  PAKISTAN - MORE - COLORS - MORE  – SCENES

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Text: Nayyar Hashmey

Images: Saraiki Youth Forum/Value9

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Village pottery is a handicraft that is popular among the young as well as the old. Here in this picture a village lass is painting money boxes for children. Such beautifully painted money boxes as well as water pitchers are used by the village folk as water containers as well as for money saving by the kids.
This type of pottery is so attractive that many people in the rural areas as well as those in the big urban centres  use it as souvenirs too.

In the desert districts of Pakistan, because of the nomadic way of life, main wealth of the people are their cattle which are bred and milked or shorn for their wool. But of very special significance in th economy of these villages is camel. This ship of the desert not only brings food, clothing and all other items of daily use but is also the principal vehicle for travel and transport.
Camel is also a special favorite of the children. They play with it, have a joy ride (under supervision of their parents), travel on long distances and sometimes also play the part of a camel guide when the kid leads the camel with a string and the camel follows its young master without any harm to the kid.

Another attractive buyline for the youngs of rural Pakistan. The chicks are painted in different bright colors by sellers and the children love such stuff painted in rainbow colors. Its another matter that they don’t know these chicks are painted and think they are born with such bright rich colors.

A woman churning yogurt to get lassi and butter, a daily morning core which village women never miss to accomplish every day in the morning.

Another view of a village home immaculately kept by the dwellers of the house.

Makai di roti (bread made of corn flour) taken with Mustard Saag is a delicacy which is loved by all. Its not only relished by the rural folk but also is as much liked by the city dwellers as it is loved in the villages of Pakistan.

A village man milking his buffalo.

Iss pik ko daikh ke kutchh yaad aya?

These gondola type boats are very popular in the Saraiki belt. But of special significance are such boats, a common sight in River Indus near Sukkur and other cities, towns and villages around the beaches of Indus River in Sindh.
During my visits to Sukkur, I frequently saw such Pakistani gondolas either moored along the shores of Indus river or sailing in the wide span of waters of Sindhu Darya.
What fascinated me there was these boats which had complete paraphernalia of a home but the occupants spoke the language which was not Sindhi but the Saraiki boli [spoken in Mianwali/Bhakkar and adjoining areas].
I was told by locals that these people migrated from Mianwali district to Sindh many many years before.
[In this picture here, food bags are being loaded on one such boat].

Gondola type boats with brightly colored pictures, drawings and buntings / multicolored flags are parked on the bank of Indus River, in the area of Attock Khurd. Mostly people of district Attock & Nowshera do visit on weekends.
Attock Khurd is famous for Shrine of Hazrat Jee Baba (Ziarat), Indus River, Qila Wali Ziarat & for enjoying the bank of Darya-e-Sindh. Some of boatmen fix audio players with powerful loudspeakers to increase passengers. Image via http://hazro-pictures.blogspot.com/2010/10/some-of-boats-are-parked-on-bank-of.html

When there is will there is way.These goats demonstrate the truth in this old saying. To graze, they would reach any height! yes, any height!

One day, while I was on my way home, I found the weather to be irresistibly awesome. Especially the sun, setting on the western horizon amid layers of clouds – it shone like a jewel amid a mix of grey and crimson fluff which melted evenly across the canvas due to it’s heat. Needless to state, I seized the camera right away and hence started the clicking frenzy. (Text adapted from http://salmanlatif.wordpress.com/2011/09/06/flirting-with-the-sunset/)

Rural Pakistan much like its urban counterpart, is rich in history, heritage and culture. To express their feelings, their inspiration as well as their fascination with things equestrian, our village folk celebrate their holidays and festivals where dancing horses are the fulcrum of all such activities.
The horses trained for dancing are to be beautiful and though they may look like royal horses, are not the thoroughbred type. They are the local breeds trained to dance on the beat of a dhol (drum).
The horse dance competitions and shows are arranged on different formal events and occasions like a village mela [fair] a political function, wedding ceremony, or a cattle competition.
At the melas in Pakistan’s rural heartland, the horse dance shows are held to entertain people where horse lovers shower money on horses to show their joy and love for the equine dance.
Eqestrian dance is mainly a feature of rich Pakistani culture especially in rural areas of Punjab, where such dance performance is considered an essential part of the overall celebrations at a function. A popular nuance of the equestrian dance in Sindh and Baloch culture is found in camel dance.

A game played mainly by girls, stapoo is common amongst children in Pakistani rural areas. The game is played within a small boundary (court), drawn on the ground and with a piece of stone (theekri).

Tandoor is a cylindrical clay oven for cooking meat, poultry, fish and bread [chappati]. In this technique, the meat is usually coated or marinated with a paste of assorted herbs and spices, skewered into long metallic stick and cooked in the extremely hot and smoky conditions created by the tandoor.
The design of a tandoor is a hybrid of the masonry oven and the makeshift earth oven, which is used exclusively for radiant heat and live fire cooking. The oven is dug into the earth and bears a thick clay enclosure where the heat can easily reach upto 400 degrees Celsius. Some of the best known tandoor recipes are tandoori chicken, chicken tikka, chicken kebab and tandoori roti.
In the image above, a village woman is busy making one such tandoor. Gradually will she raise the cylinder which will ultimately turn into a professionally looking good sized tandoor.

In search of water in the desert

For the sweet tooth: Yummy Jalebis

A house in a locale typical of the deserts in the  Saraiki belt, Cholistan and Sindh.

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Pakistan India border runs through a stretch of desert spread over 500 km from the Rann of Kutch to Bahawalpour in Punjab. The deserts of Thar in Sindh, Rajasthan (India) and Cholistan (Punjab)  form a continuous belt of dry, sparsely populated land.
Contrary to a general impression,Thar Desert, however is not an inhospitable, empty wasteland, but is often called with good reasons, the “Friendly Desert”. It is accessible, not too hot and colorful, and makes a perfect four-day trip from Karachi.
More than half a million people, majority of them Hindus, live in the desert which is spread over 13,000 square km.  The women of Thar wear long, full red or orange skirts and cover their heads with embroidered or tie-dyed shawls. The people live in round mud-walled busts thatched with grass and surrounded with thick thorn hedges.
There is always plenty of activity in the villages: women come with pots on their heads or with donkeys to fetch water, whereas the herds of camels and cattle drink from the pond. The wells are generally very deep and animals are needed to haul the water up-a 50 meter deep well which requires the strength of a camel, while the shallower wells can be worked by two or four donkeys harnessed together.
Wandering Sindhi musicians sometimes sit by the wells or at the shires and give impromptu concerts.

A boatman takes passengers to their desired destination.

And at the end once again an assortment of Pakistani mithai for your sweet tooth.
Pakistanis generally have a passion for traditional sweets. Sweets have always been a part of every household since thousands of years and as such are an integral part of all occasions. But its especially the village folk in Pakistan who gorge on sweets in weddings, fairs & festivals, parties, and to celebrate all small happy moments.

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Previous: Rural Pakistan: More Colors, More Scenes [3 of 4]

Pages:   1       3    4

Concluded.

Note:  As always, click the individual image to view in full size.

You might also like: 

1. Colors of Punjab, Rural Pakistan [in four parts] 2. King’s Treatment 3. Life in a Pakistani Village 4. Kanjwani Mela – The Spirit Lives On…
Source: Saraiki Youth Forum  Value9
Wonders of Pakistan supports freedom of expression and this commitment extends to our readers as well. Constraints however, apply in case of a violation of WoP Comments Policy. We also moderate hate speech, libel and gratuitous insults.

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If you own copyrights to some material and you want us to remove it from our pages, contact us to claim your ownership and we will either credit you, or if you wish – completely remove the content.

Rural Pakistan: More Colors, More Scenes [2 of 4]…


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Pakistan’s famous truck art originates though in the big urban centres, yet these richly painted trucks most of the time ply on highways which pass along the villages. This biggest art show on the roads of Pakistan thus adds beauty of rich color, and aesthetics of elegant paintings on the move, to the already colorful, rustic but beautiful village life of Pakistan.
 

RURAL  PAKISTAN - MORE – COLORS – MORE  – SCENES

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Text: Nayyar Hashmey 

Images: Saraiki Youth Forum/Value9

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A very common village scene in Pakistan. Common? Yes, but why did I, select this image! Because image though common has been shot in such a way that some photoshopping, has rendered it have a look of painting and that’s the beauty of this image. 

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The wooden model of a whey churning device and a spinning wheel. Artistic carpentry and pottery has traditionally been popular in rural Pakistan. Apart from children who love such toys, handicrafts of the type are excellent decorative pieces and serve as souvenirs of the area where they are crafted.

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Shavaa! meray shero, shaava! [Bravo my hoofer, bravo!] 

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Three village kids busy playing a game, when they saw the camera on my shoulder, posed in a line to be photographed. Here they are.

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The deserts in rural Pakistan, like Thal in the Saraiki belt, Cholistan in the district of Bahawalpur and Tharparkar in Sindh as well as parts of Balochistan, camels are the most practical mode to travel. 
But as is the case, necessity is always the mother of invention, here in this image a villager from the Saraiki belt in southern Punjab has attached his bike also to his camel. When there is a pucca  road, he can leave his camel to a secure place and ride on his bike to move to any place he may like. No problem of CNG shut downs and escalating petrol prices!

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Villager washing vegetables picked fresh from the field.

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A stunning shot. [In background is the River Chenab].

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Charkha (spinning wheel) is one of the oldest known tool for spinning of yarn. It works similarly to the great wheel, with a drive wheel being turned by hand, while the yarn is spun off the tip of the spindle.
Charkha, is ideal for spinning cotton and other fine, short-staple fibers, though it can be used to spin other fibers as well. The size varies, from that of a hardbound novel to the size of a briefcase, to a floor charkha.
Although Charkha nowadays is restricted to spin yarn for fabrics like khaises, durries (floor mattings) and khaddar for shalwar qameez ensembles, villagers’ fascination with their centuries old charkha sometimes takes such forms as the one here, [charkha studded with camel bone decorative designs]. For relatively cheaper models, white plastic or brass pieces in intricate designs are embedded into the spinning device.

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Although laser mounted land levelers are  gradually replacing the old manual mode of leveling the fields, there are still many such villages in Pakistan that employ the old traditional method of leveling the land with the help of bullocks.

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‘Daadi Amma’ [granny] with her grand daughter, waiting for the family for  dinner. A changair with freshly baked flat bread called Roti is lying on the floor. This along with the curry will serve the main meals at noon as well as in the evening.

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The kitchen in a village home. There are four outlets for the smoke that comes out of wood fire. During my visit to the village of my in laws, about two weeks back, in Chak # 479 /GB in Tehsil Samundari, distt. Faisalabad, I noticed such outlets in my uncle’s home. I had an impression that they now use LPG cylinders for cooking. Was, however informed that fuel wood is still cheaper in our villages and therefore the people prefer wood over Sui gas stored in pressurized cylinders. 
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The cart and the Bull

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Another view of Rasoi or the kitchen of a village home immaculately kept by the dwellers of the house
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Sunset

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Amazing! Captured while on way to Multan

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This image is a beautiful depiction of village having a river, a forest and the boat, (am not though sure of its origin).

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Red Onions. Ready to pick for the best in flavour and taste, for your salad and for the main dish [whether stewed, barbecue, or the meet/vegetable curry] 

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Tandoor has a special significance in the Pakistani cuisine. Compared to urban centres where people are used to try different types of bread [these vary from unleavened flat bread to chapati made on a tawa, or in the traditional tandoor, the common bakery bread as wll as bread in the form of buns, burgers etc.] the village folk mainly use flat breat cooked either on a tawa or in a tandoor.
Here in this image a helper is making dough balls commonly called pairhas. These are then flattened to a circular form and then applied on the inner walls of the tandoor. The radiant heat and the live fire inside the tandoor makes the flattened bread turn into hot, crispy, great tasting chapatis.

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For the tasty bite. The  hot, crispy samosas, right from karhahi. 
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The courtyard of a typical Pakistani village. On the right is a “choolha” or the hearth  and just along side the main entrance, is  the “cupboard” to  lodge the crockery used by the women of Pakistani villages.
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The shots fired on the Pakistani school girl Malala in October this year, struck the heart of the Pakistani nation. As the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan refuse to back down, so too do the people of Pakistan. This violent and hateful act has accomplished the opposite of its intent, as the whole nation rallies to embrace Malala’s principles and reject the tyranny of fear.
A spokesman for the Pakistani Taliban said “let this be a lesson.” Yes. Let this be a lesson—that education is a basic human right, a right that Pakistan’s daughters will not be denied.
[In the image above at a school in the Kallarwali village, girls are busy doing their school work, send befitting reply to the forces of darkness].

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A kid arranging roasted corn on cobs for sale. On  left is the crude, clay furnace having a cast iron wok  commonly called karhahi. Karhahi is a heavier, deeper and smaller wok than the stereotypical Chinese type. Traditionally these karhahis are the usual utensil for this purpose, however, these must be continually seasoned.

A milk man on his way to serve his customers

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Traditional footwear for Pakistani men. Compared to western shoes, the foot wear commonly called chappal or in Saraiki areas as Khairhi are soft, airy and easily adaptable to meet requirements of all seasons weather.

Contd…

Next: Rural Pakistan: More Colors, More Scenes [3 of 4]

Pages:        4

Note:  As always, click the individual image to view in full size.

You might also like: 

1Colors of Punjab, Rural Pakistan [in four parts] 2. King’s Treatment 2. Life in a Pakistani Village 3. Kanjwani Mela – The Spirit Lives On…
Source: Saraiki Youth Forum  Value9
Wonders of Pakistan supports freedom of expression and this commitment extends to our readers as well. Constraints however, apply in case of a violation of WoP Comments Policy. We also moderate hate speech, libel and gratuitous insults.

YOUR COMMENT IS IMPORTANT

DO NOT UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF YOUR COMMENT

We do not claim exclusive rights on all articles, images or videos published on this site. The sources we use to create our articles, images, videos etc. are credited with a proper linkback. However, we do host material from unknown authors we receive via mails, from friends and our readers.
If you own copyrights to some material and you want us to remove it from our pages, contact us to claim your ownership and we will either credit you, or if you wish – completely remove the content.

Rural Pakistan: More Colors, More Scenes [1 of 4]


A very common village scene in Pakistan. Common? Yes, but why then did I, select this image! Because image though common has been shot in such a way that (probably) some photoshopping, has rendered it have a look of painting and that’s the beauty of this image.
 

- RURAL – PAKISTAN - MORE – COLORS - MORE  – SCENES

·

Text: Nayyar Hashmey 

Images: Saraiki Youth Forum/Value9

 

Normally I don’t like photoshopped images, but this one here has been done with such finesse that the green background perfectly fits into the greener fields which are a hallmark of rural Pakistan.
Bullock carts though are gradually being replaced by mechanized transport such as a tractor or the tractor trolley, yet its still the iconic symbol of the village life in Pakistan.

Look how green is my village!
Overview of a village home

A village woman selling roasted chickpeas, peanuts, or corn (depending upon season)

A view from the Chanan Pir Festival. Channan Pir is a village in the Punjab province of Pakistan, it is named after a Sufi saint and contains his tomb. It is located between the Derawar and Din Garh forts and lies a few kilometres from Yazman town, and in the start of the Cholistan desert.
The village is linked to the saint Jalaluddin Surkh-Posh Bukhari who was said to have come to the village while travelling en route to Jaisalmir during the 13th century.
It is a centre of the spiritual and cultural heritage of Yazman and Cholistan. Cultural activities are observed when the Urs (a religious fair) of Channan Pir is held. Urs is held on seven consecutive Thursdays starting in the month of March every year. The visitors throw tabbaruk (the sacred sweet) and the persons who pick and taste this tabarruk are supposed to be fortunate in achieving their worldly pursuits.

The Silhouette

A village scene from the Chakwal district in the province of Punjab, Pakistan.

The big bohrh (banyan) tree with its thick cool shade

Colorful trolley, colorful attire, all in a rural setting 

Cane-ware seller with his products on bike, specially including the cane trays commonly called “changairs” used for freshly cooked bread loaves (the chappatis).

The nests of weaver birds, a very common sight in the rural areas of Pakistan. To ward off predators and the ‘thieves’ like common crows these nests usually have an entrance on the bottom side.  This camouflages the entrance and checks other intruders not to disturb the sanctity of the house.
If there is an opening large enough for a crow to intrude, they usually trespass the weaver birds’ homes and eat up the eggs.

Although diesel driven generators are gradually taking over the conventional out-moded wells from where farmers draw water through Persian wheels, still in the areas where there is no electricity  or fuel costs are too much for the men on farms, Persian wheels are still being used for irrigation.
Here in this image in the Soon Sakesar valley in the Khushab district of Punjab, Pakistan, a camel driven Persian wheel draws water for drinking as well as for irrigation.

Fresh from the field: Vegetables on display

The cuty little one trying to copy her mother in blowing the pipe. Such blow pipe is used to throw air or oxygen in to the simmering wood fire which with supply of more oxygen ignites into proper flames, which otherwise keeps on sending smoke with almost no heat which is needed to cook the meals or milk at proper temperature.

Mairi peeng de hularay

The huge charpoy or hamacha outside a driver hotel

The Morning Scene: Charpoys with bed sheets,  pillows and khes’es. The house inmates have had a sound sleep. There is an electric fan standing nearby to cool up the nightly summer weather.
Soon these charpoys will be removed and stacked against a wall. The conventional home textiles too will be folded and then put on a charpoy again till the fall of the next evening.

Covered all in produce from the field, a villager on way his home.

A simple toy made by village craftsmen for the children of Pakistani villages.
The toy has two wheels made of wood. A simple mechanism makes the small reed stick to beat a tiny drumlet. When the child walks, the moving wheels run the stick and the drum beating starts. The sound of the beating of the drumlet as well as the moving ‘vehicle’ elates the children and their jubilation knows no bounds.

Blues, hues and reflection.

Plantation on raised beds: Green raised fields are typical of villages in Punjab and Sindh.

The boats, oars and the river. Waiting for you.

A milk man on his way to serve his customers

A bullock ready to move·

Contd…

Next: Rural Pakistan: More Colors, More Scenes [2 of 4]…

Pages:  1   2   3   4

Note:  As always, click the individual image to view in full size.

You might also like: 

1Colors of Punjab, Rural Pakistan [in four parts] 2. King’s Treatment 2. Life in a Pakistani Village 3. Kanjwani Mela – The Spirit Lives On…
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