Spring in Hunza

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Hunza, the mytical country mostly attired in white snow, undrapes its white cloakin spring. It is the time when its sensuous hilly contours become bare and like a magnet tempt all, to view the magnificent beauty of a youthful, vibrant and humming vale of Hunza. The indigenous population welcomes the naked beauty of their country-at its best in spring with an ongoing feeling of love, inspiration and fortitude.
Hunza, the land of fairytales, is like an Aphrodite dancing on the floor, a floor located right on the base of glorious Rakaposhi mountain, where the visitors hear the rivers roar in jubilation and excitement to appreciate Hunza’s dancing beauty. In an ecstasy they brush stones to pebbles. It is the time when a soft breeze murmurs to divulge the centuries old secrets, when the old pines embrace the clouds with a passion to swing the droplets on flexible twigs. A terrain of serenity, the eternal beauty that beholds onlookers for a second or two, oblivious of their worldly life.
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HUNZA

Where-time-stops-and-the fairies-tread

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WoP Research Desk

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Hunza, the mythical country mostly attired in a white snow, undrapes its white gown in spring. It is the time when its sensuous hilly contours become bare and like a magnet tempt all, to view the magnificent beauty of a youthful, vibrant and humming vale of Hunza. The indigenous population welcomes the naked beauty of their country-at its best in spring with an ongoing feeling of love, inspiration and fortitude.

Hunza, the land of fairytales, is like an Aphrodite dancing on the floor, a floor located right on the base of glorious Rakaposhi mountain, where the visitors hear the rivers roar in jubilation and excitement to appreciate Hunza’s dancing beauty. In an ecstasy they brush stones to pebbles. It is the time when a soft breeze murmurs to divulge the centuries old secrets, when the old pines embrace the clouds with a passion to swing the droplets on flexible twigs. A terrain of serenity, the eternal beauty that beholds onlookers for a second or two, oblivious of their worldly life.

Hunza is in the northern-most part of the federally administered northern areas in Pakistan. Once a princely state, Hunza lost its royal status in 1974 and joined hands with the Federal Government based in Islamabad. In the South, Gilgit agency borders Hunza while in the East the former princely state of Nagar fringes its margins. The valley also enjoys the neighborhood of China to the north and Afghanistan to the northwest. The celebrated town of Baltit, which now, is known, as Karimabad is its capital.

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Hunza: The Baltit Fort in spring.

Hunza was an independent princely state for 900 years ruled by “Mirs” until 1974. It remained as a subordinate of Kashmir during the regime of Maharaja Ranbir Singh, while the Mirs of Hunza used to send an annual tribute, as a token of their loyalty to the Raja’s court till 1947.

Geographically, gigantic mountains that have stretched over an area of 110 kilometers surround the valley. The terrain is full of variety with diversity in the heights of the peaks of 1500 meters to 8000 meters, the world-famous Rakaposhi (7788 m) peak is one of them which, against the calm blue sky, shimmers to the maximum and creates an illusion to captivate the eye up to a level where time seems to be stopping for ever.

The heights of Rakaposhi (7788 m) and the Ultar (7738 m) are the backdrops of this paradise valley where the glacial water of Ultar is known for some therapeutic distinctiveness, which, in favorable circumstances have caused the aboriginal populace, long life and a very low ratio of heart diseases. Researchers are pondering over the natural composition of this glacial water to disclose the secret that causes a longer life.

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Spring in Hunza is a myriad of colours, hues and shapes.

The valley is blessed naturally with luxuriantly green orchards (mostly of Apricot), streams full of dancing waters, roaring rivers, and meadows stretching in the quietude like that of heavens at a height which, is a unique feature of Pakistan’s northern areas. The juniper, pine and Devdar are the trees that, in their trunk rings, have recorded the cycles of rainy and snowy seasons of centuries.

Apricot Blossom is the spring time in Hunza valley

The blue of sky, the emerald of flora and the turquoise of water add to the palette, nature has used to paint this landscape full of mountains, trees and flowers with a divine composition of colors and the brightness of the rising sun, worshiped by the whiteness of the snow which, on some peaks, have never melted for millions of years. Spring in Hunza has a myriad of colous, shapes and hues.

The federally administered northern areas of Pakistan are divided into five districts where the chief secretary who is appointed by the federal government from Islamabad rules the roost.

Hunza has seen invasions of the horse ridden Greeks, the Persians, the caste ridden Aryans, to maverick British, and sturdy Afghans and many other hordes of attackers including the Muslims. Having seen and experienced that chivalry of invaders, the soil saw the brutal times of Dogras of Kashmir. However, contrary to the Kashmiris of the main valley, the Hunzavadis through their Mirs, never allowed the Jammu Dogra dynasty have a full sway over their affairs, which is why the loam of this area has engrossed the aroma of different civilizations and the culture of various bordering nations but retained its distinct identity.

The first century AD marked this area as a trade center like Kashgar. From 4th to 11th century AD, it was a hub of Buddhist culture under the Sogdiana dynasty. Later the Kushans, Hindushahis and then the Muslims had their influence on the country called Hunza.

Hunza being a remote area was almost a myth, a legend in the world of tourism. Its gate opened to the entire world in 1970 when the historic Korakoram Highway (KKH) was built up. Constructed on the remains of ancient silk rout from Pakistan into China, the highway itself is a wonder of engineering.

There is a common belief that the people of Hunza are descendants of the soldiers from Alexander’s army, a belief which is subject to reservations by many scholars. Its indigenous language Burushaski too is an enigma in itself, no traces or links have been found yet regarding this language having an affinity or link to other known tongues of the globe.

Apricots have long been an important crop in these valleys and an essential source of income. Growing between 1,800-3,200 metres above sea level, below peaks that reach 8,000 metres high, the orchards of apricots, intercropped with alfalfa and forest trees, are irrigated by spring water or glacial melt waters brought in by complex systems of canals over great distances to the carefully terraced slopes.

The people here mostly cultivate apricots, a brand produce of the valley. In Hunza, one often finds the roofs having acquired an orange colour because in every home the drying of apricots is in full swing, they spread the valley’s major produce for drying on their roofs and hence the orange hue which dominates every roof. A word of caution, however! If you feel obsessed to capture these shades of orange, be careful! Often, it is the ladies who indulge in this art of drying apricots and would not like to be exposed to any sort of lens, man’s, digital or conventional.

The Baltit Fort in Karimabad is a place of unique enjoyment and pleasure. Here standing on its terrace, you can have a stunning look of beautiful mountains all around, but if you look downwards, right at the foot of the fort there are beautiful little houses of the town of Karimabad, which equally captivate you; it’s highly natural and picturesque urban landscape in a hilly locale.

Spring in Hunza is a season to enjoy, celebrate and experience the height of delight and a delight of the height, an expression of elation for your body and soul. Birds sing in spring, plants ornate with new leaves, brightly coloured flowers sprout up every where. This is a scene which can’t be described in words; it’s a scene which must be seen. Seeing is Believing folks!

“ALL THOSE THINGS ARE BEAUTIFUL, THE PERCEPTION OF WHICH PLEASE”, SAID SHAKESPEARE.

Hunza FactSheet:

Hunza offers multiple coices in holiday spending including the Climbing Expeditions

  •  Trekking / Hiking
  • Cultural Tours
  • Geographic –Expeditions
  • Silk Route /Central Asia Tours
  • Safaris: Air-Jeep and Camel
  • Boat trips
  • White water Rafting
  • Mountains Bike Tours
  • Autumn / Blossom

Other Features

  • Elevation
  • Peaks
  • Best Season to visit
  • Temperatures
  • Transportation
  • Languages

Special Note: Hunza like other districts in the Northern Areas of Pakistan (FANA) is a peaceful valley and security situation there is normal. (Unlike FATA where visitors are at the moment strictly advised NOT to travel).

Images [top to botton]  1,  2,  3,  4,    6           

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11 CommentsLeave a comment

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  3. waaoo…!!!!! we are amazed

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  9. Hi which are the best months to visit hunza? And what are the best and reasonable places to stay? Can you give an estimate about how much money should we carry if we go for a week? Also should we involve some travel agency or are their local guides available?

  10. GHi which are the best months to visit hi whhunza? And what are the best and reasonable places to stay? Can you give an estimate about how much money should we carry if we go for a week? Also should we involve some travel agency or are their local guides available?

  11. […] Spring in Hunza | Wonders of Pakistan – 17.03.2009 · Hunza, the mytical country mostly attired in white snow, undrapes its white cloakin spring. It is the time when its sensuous hilly contours …… […]


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