We Are All Muslims: A Sikh Response to Islamophobia in the NYPD and Beyond

“We are not Muslims” hasn’t been so effective for our community, has it? Even if we do so in a positive way that does not condone attacks on Muslims, simply educating the public about the fact that we are a distinct community and that we in fact “are not Muslim” will not get to the root of the problem.
As long as we live in a country (and world) where an entire community (in this case, Muslims) is targeted, spied on and vilified, we will not be safe, we will not be free.
As Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote in his letter from a Birmingham jail in 1963, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.”
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WE ARE ALL MUSLIMS

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by Sonny Singh

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The following piece from Sonny Singh reminds me of the pre 9/11 days, when we never had heard of things like suicide bombings, sectarian clashes of the proportion we have it now, or the manifestations of religious extremism as we see in Pakistan nowadays.

When I look to my own self, I have never been a religious man. A firm believer in Allah and his  holy prophet Muhammad (PBUH) and offering prayers off and on. That was my Islam. But ever since 9/11, the world media starting branding every Muslim as a sinister, war monger, religious zealot out to kill every infidel on the street, my secularism started thinning out.

We started reading in the media that all bad things emanate from Muslims and Islam, so much so, just after 9/11 when Fox News started broadcasting its programmes in Pakistan (Thanks Mr. P. Musharraf who allowed this mouth piece of US corporate world), even dared branding our prophet, that great apostle and great messenger of peace as terrorist, my idea of being secular Muslim was almost in the air.

It were these and so many similar things that started happening after 9/11 and which made me, a non practicing Muslim, a secularist sort of person to ponder over the very reason of being a Muslim and then it dawned upon me that we Muslims are being branded as terrorists because it were we who helped the mighty US defeat its sole rival in the international arena and it were again we Muslims who will have to pay th price of fighting America’s war.

This factor made me to think and analyse  more about my own faith and see for my self whether our religion was indeed inciting Muslims to kill all other infidels simply for the sake of converting them to Islam, even though I myself was not practicing Islam myself.

After having read the true meaning of Islam,  as a secularist Muslim, I started thinking myself more as a Muslim than a secularist. And this! I think is the status of mind of every Muslim. Now every one of us is forced to say, Yes I am Muslim.

It’s in this context tha I came across a post by Sonny Singh. Sonny is A Sikh. Sikhism is a religion much different from Islam although there are many common things between Islam and Sikhism. But neither have Sikhs ever considered themselves as Muslims nor have Muslims thought ever that they were Sikhs. But Americans killing Sikhs just because they have beards like Muslims has made Sonny also to say I am Muslim, similarly as western secularism has made a lot of common Muslims like me to say with much force now, “YES, I AM MUSLIM”. [Nayyar]

As a brown-skinned Sikh with a turban on my head and a long beard on my chin, I deal with my fair share of racist and xenophobic harassment regularly, including in my home of New York City, the most diverse city on the planet. It usually takes the form of someone yelling or perhaps mumbling at me: Osama bin Laden/terrorist/al Qaeda/he’s going to blow up the [insert location]/go back to your country/etc. Less often, someone might threaten me, get in my face, or in one case, pull of my turban on the subway.

My experience is not terribly unique for a turban-wearing Sikh in the United States. Especially since 9/11, we Sikhs have become all too familiar with racial epithets, bullying and violence. Just last month, a gurdwara in Michigan was vandalized with hostile anti-Muslim graffiti. Last year, in what we can assume was a hate attack, two elderly Sikh men were shot and killed while taking an evening walk in a quiet neighborhood in Elk Grove, Calif.

Many talk about the prevalence of anti-Sikh attacks as a case of “mistaken identity.” Sikhs mistaken for Muslims. Indeed, we are by and large attacked because of anti-Muslim bigotry. The Michigan gurdwara was targeted for that reason, and most of us who experience racist harassment as Sikhs in the U.S. experience it through the vilification of Muslims and/or Arabs.

Ironically, many Sikhs themselves vilify Muslims or at least distance themselves from the Muslim community at every possible opportunity. I remember in the days, weeks and months after 9/11, the first thing out of the mouths of many Sikhs when talking to the press, to politicians or even to their neighbors was, “We are not Muslims.” While this is of course a fact, the implication of the statement if it stops there is: You’re attacking the wrong community. Don’t come after us, go after the Muslims! Sikhs believe in equality and freedom and love our country and our government. But Muslims? We don’t like them either.

The roots of anti-Muslim sentiment in the Sikh community run deep in South Asia, from the days of the tyranny of Mughal emperors such as Aurangzeb in the 17th century to the bloodshed in 1947 when our homeland of Punjab was sliced into two separate nation-states. Despite these historical realities, Sikhism has always been clear that neither Muslims as a people nor Islam as a religion were ever the enemy. Tyranny was the enemy. Oppression was the enemy. Sectarianism was the enemy. In fact, the Guru Granth Sahib, our scriptures that are the center of Sikh philosophy and devotion, contains the writings of Muslim (Sufi) saints alongside those of our own Sikh Gurus. Nevertheless, historical memory breeds misguided hostility and mistrust of Muslims, especially in the contemporary global context of ever-increasing, mainstream Islamophobia.

What is it going to take for Sikhs and Muslims to join together in solidarity against the common enemies of racist harassment and violence, racial and religious profiling, and Islamophobic bigotry? Perhaps the recently exposed

NYPD spying program (along with the “education” officers have received about Islam) will serve as a wake up call to my community (and other communities for that matter) about how bad things have really gotten. While we Sikhs confront bigotry on a daily basis from our neighbors, classmates, co-workers, employers and strangers on the street, our Muslim American counterparts are systematically targeted by our own government. (I should note that, of course, Sikhs too are profiled by law enforcement in less repressive, though still troubling, ways, especially at airport security).

Sikhism was born hundreds of years ago in part to stand up for the most oppressed and fight for the freedom and liberation of all people. If this isn’t reason enough for us to make the cause of rooting out Islamophobia from the NYPD and other law enforcement and government agencies our own, we only have to return to the bleak reality we Sikhs in the U.S. still face right now in 2012. A time when gurdwaras are still vandalized with anti-Muslim statements, Sikh kids are still being bullied and tormented at school every day, and I am called Osama bin Laden while walking down a Manhattan street for the 258th time (no I’m not counting).

“We are not Muslims” hasn’t been so effective for our community, has it? Even if we do so in a positive way that does not condone attacks on Muslims, simply educating the public about the fact that we are a distinct community and that we in fact “are not Muslim” will not get to the root of the problem. As long as we live in a country (and world) where an entire community (in this case, Muslims) is targeted, spied on and vilified, we will not be safe, we will not be free.

As Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote in his letter from a Birmingham jail in 1963, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.”

I hope the NYPD’s blatant assault on the civil rights of our Muslim sisters and brothers propels us Sikhs as well as all people of conscience to action. Perhaps “We are not Muslims” will become “We are all Muslims,” as we come together to eradicate Islamophobic bigotry in all its forms.

Sonny Singh is a musician and social justice educator living in Brooklyn, New York.
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