Sher-e-Punjab Maharaja Ranjit Singh

maharajaranjitsingh1

Ranjit Singh’s story though is apocryphal, yet continues to be told by the Punjabis to this day because it has the answer to the questions why Ranjit Singh was able to unite Punjabi Mussulmans, Hindus and Sikhs and create one and the only kingdom in the history of the Punjab.
Another anecdote, equally apocryphal and even more popular, illustrates the second reason why Ranjit Singh succeeded in the face of heavy odds: his single minded pursuit of power.
It is said that once his Muslim wife, Mohran, remarked on his ugliness—he was dark, pitted with small pox and blind of one eye [‘exactly like an old mouse with grey whiskers and one eye’—Emily Eden]. ‘Where were your Highness when God was distributing beauty?’ ‘I had gone to find myself a kingdom,’ replied the monarch.
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MAHARAJA RANJIT SINGH

EMBODIMENT OF SECULAR SIKH RULE

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by Khushwant Singh

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On this auspicious occasion [of Baisakhi] when Sikhs from all corners of the globe would converge on a beautiful gurdwara in Hassan Abdal – the holy place where the miracle of rock took place, here is what Khushwant Singh writes on the life and time of the man who ordered construction of this most beautiful and the second holiest shrine of Sikhism in Pakistan.

The famous Indian author in his book ‘Ranjit Singh’, Maharaja of the Punjab, depicts the persona of this man in following words:-

calligraphist who had spent many years making a copy of the holy Koran and had failed to get any of the Muslim princes of Hindustan to give him an adequate price for his labours turned up at Lahore to try and sell it to the Foreign Minister, Fakeer Azizuddin. The Fakeer praised the work but expressed his inability to pay for it. The argument was overheard by Ranjit Singh who summoned the calligraphist to his presence. The Maharaja respectfully pressed the holy book against his forehead and then scrutinized the writing with his single eye. He was impressed with the excellence of the work and bought the Koran for his private collection.  Some time later Fakeer Azizuddin asked him why he had paid such a price for a book for which he as a Sikh, would have no use. Ranjit Singh replied: ‘God intended me to look upon all religions with one eye; that is why he took away the light from the other.’

***

The story is apocryphal. But it continues to be told by the Punjabis to this day because it has the answer to the questions why Ranjit Singh was able to unite Punjabi Mussulmans, Hindus and Sikhs and create one and the only kingdom in the history of the Punjab. Another anecdote, equally apocryphal and even more popular, illustrates the second reason why Ranjit Singh succeeded in the face of heavy odds: his single minded pursuit of power. It is said that once his Muslim wife, Mohran, remarked on his ugliness—he was dark, pitted with small pox and blind of one eye (‘exactly like an old mouse with grey whiskers and one eye’—Emily Eden). ‘Where were your Highness when God was distributing beauty?’ ‘I had gone to find myself a kingdom,’ replied the monarch.

Ranjit Singh has been poorly served by his biographers. Hindu and Sikh admirers deified him as a virtuous man and a selfless patriot. This academic apotheosis reduced a full blooded man and an astute politician to an anemic saint and a simple minded nationalist. Muslim historians are unduly harsh in describing him as an avaricious freebooter.  English writers, who took their material largely from Muslim sources, portrayed him as a cunning man (the cliché often used is ‘wily oriental’), devoid of moral considerations, whose only redeeming feature was his friendship with the English. They were not only averse to picking up any gossip they could (every oriental court has always been a whispering gallery of rumours), but also gave them currency by incorporating them in works of history.

Ranjit Singh however was neither a selfless patriot nor an avaricious freebooter. He was neither a model of virtue nor a lascivious sensualist. Above all he was too warm and lively a character to have his story told in a lifeless catalogue of facts, figures and footnotes.

As a political figure Ranjit Singh was in every way as remarkable a man as his two famous contemporaries, Napoleon Bonaparte of France and Muhammad Ali of Egypt. He rose from the status of a petty chieftain to become the most powerful Indian ruler of his time. He was the first ruler in a thousand years to stem the tide of invasions from whence they had come across the North-West frontiers of Hindustan. Although he dispossessed hundreds of feudal landholders to consolidate his kingdom, he succeeded in winning their affection and converting them into faithful courtiers.

In the history of the world, it would be hard to find another despot who never took life in cold blood, yet built as large an empire as Ranjit’s. He persuaded the turbulent Sikhs and Mussulmans of the Punjab to become the willing instruments of an expansionist policy which brought the Kashmiris and the Pathans of the North-West Frontier under his subjection and extended his sphere of influence from the borders of China and Afghanistan in the north to the deserts of Sindh in the south.

95588883 
The Tomb of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in Lahore

His success was undoubtedly due to his ability to arouse the nascent sense of nationalism amongst his people and make them conscious that more important than being Muslim, Hindu or Sikh was the fact of being Punjabi. His Sikh and Hindu troops subdued the Sikh and Hindu Rajas of the Punjab. His Mussulman Najibs rejected the appeals of their Hindustani, Afghan and Pathan co-religionists to crusade against the ‘infidel’ and instead helped to liquidate the crusaders. The year Ranjit Singh died, it was his Muslim troops led by colonel Sheikh Basswan that crossed the Khyber pass and carried Ranjit’s colors through the streets of Kabul in the victory parade. And a couple of years later Zorawar Singh, a Dogra Hindu, planted the Sikh flag in the heart of Tibet. These events were the high water mark of Punjabi imperialism which had carried Ranjit Singh to the heights of power and which subsided soon after his death.

Khushwant Singh (born 2 Feb. 1915) is an Indian novelist and journalist. Singh’s weekly column, “With Malice towards One and All”, carried by several Indian newspapers, is among the most widely-read columns in India.
Note: Picture on top is a rare and historic painting of Maharaja Ranjit Singh. The portrait is likely to have been painted during his lifetime. It was possibly the study for a lithograph that it was widely reproduced in various publications including Bibliotèque Universelle, Voyages en Asie, 1836. 

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19 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. [...] This cup of tea was served by: Wonders of Pakistan [...]

  2. [...] Sahib: The Miracle that Refused to Happen 4. Khota Qabar & the Story of a Lost Battle 5. Sher-e-Punjab Maharaja Ranjit Singh 6. Baba Guru Nanak Dev Ji & His Message [...]

  3. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh!
    It was nice but not the best I think I should just get a windows computer.I need information about maharaja ranjit singh because that is my homework for personal planning.

  4. hi wel work ji

    • @Asghar Pehlwan

      O thank you Pehlwan Ji. Tuhadi appreciation da bohat bohat shukriya.

  5. Jainism, Buddhism and Sikhism, all are the extended arms of the great ancient Indian culture meant to embrace the entire globe. That’s why we feel proud when one appreciates these faiths but are deeply hurt when statues of our gods, are destroyed.

  6. Noori kl gajal ka matla aur uska husm peshe khidmat gai arg karta hu…
    Noori uafa ka jikra bhi kitana hasseen hai .
    Ham pee raqe jahar bhi makedar ho na ho…..

    majhab hai agar koi ……hai majhabe insanee …
    Hai majhabe insani .
    Hindu na muslim hai ,h.ai sikh na Isaai …2

    Secular instincnt of we Indian has given birth to Noori at present and Ranjeet Singh in the past .

  7. ….Killing a terrorist will
    serve no purpose,
    address the root cause
    and avoid so called
    collateral deaths.
    Collateral killings breed
    more hate and revenge.’
    …………Raja Mujtaba
    By Air Commodore
    An attack with a precision better than the Drone’s, is required and that can only be realized by face to face encounters. How will this be done? Let it be invented by Pakistani experts .They have better technology than Drones. U.S has to beg for it ……

    • Dr. AKT, I really don’t understand what drones and the so called inventions that you describe have to do with this post?????

  8. [...] the pool, on an elevated platform, stands a beautiful small gurdawara, built in the Mughal style by Maharaja Ranjeet Singh (1780-1839). The gurdawara houses the Granth Sahib – the holy book of Sikhs. A large double [...]

  9. No doubt, the sher e punjab was a real king, and a pure sikh.

  10. How wonderful if the great Maharaja Ranjit Singh had a 2nd birth. His reincarnation could bring peace between India and Pakistan, as its he and only he who would have looked the Mussalmans, the Sikhs, Hindus and Christians all with his one eye, no bias, no prejudice for any community, any religion.

    • Right you are Hari Singh. Maharaja Ranjit Singh was no doubt a Sikh but at the same time he ran a kingdom which had a very practical sort of ambience amongst different subjects of his Raj, who were Muslims, Sikhs, Hindus as well as Christians.

      • Dr. Nayyar Hashmey Saheb,
        I’ve heard Maharaja ‘s family is still there in Pakistan. So he stands as the ‘Sajhi Virasat’ of both India n Pakistan.

  11. Jis Ranjeet Singh ko Punjab ka hero samjhty ho uss ne uss waqat ke sooba Multan me hazaron Seraiky Mussalmano ka qatl-e-aam krwaya tha aur hazaron auraton ki izzatain looti theen aur unke suhag ujarh diyay thay, yahan tak ke Wali-e-Multan Muzaffar aur uss ke baiton ko bhi shaheed kar diya. Hum nafrat kartay haen Ranjeet Singh se. We want seraikistan. We hate Punjab and Takht-e-Lahore.

  12. [...] Punja Sahib: The Miracle that Refused to Happen 5. Khota Qabar & the Story of a Lost Battle 6. Sher-e-Punjab Maharaja Ranjit Singh 7. Baba Guru Nanak Dev Ji & His Message for [...]

  13. @ROHN SINGH said

    Not only do we have a ‘sanjhi virasat’ in terms of the geneologically similar population on both sides of the border, but also we have many more things that are common amongst us. These similarities and the commonness do demand that the two countries should come together, work together and have wars amongst them.

    Not the wars in the common sense but the wars in innovation, excellence etc. to usher us into an era of peace which might lead to a joint approach toward geopolitical issues. This however, does not mean that the two countries should forego their own individual identities as two separate nation states of the subcontinent.

  14. These were the Sikhs and Ranjit Singh, who defeated Nawab Muzaffar Khan Shaheed-the Governor Of Multan after 38 years of Battles. Punjabi Ranjeet Singh ki oulad hain. Hum Punjab ka hissa Kabhi naheen rahay.
    We will take independence from Lahore – Takhat Lahore murda Bad.

    Sab 1947 ki baat kartaye hain 1818 ki baat kartaye Sharam aati haye tumko.

  15. […] the pool, on an elevated platform, stands a beautiful small gurdawara, built in the Mughal style by Maharaja Ranjeet Singh (1780-1839). The gurdawara houses the Granth Sahib – the holy book of Sikhs. A large double […]


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